Climate Capitalism: Winning the Race to Zero Emissions and Solving the Crisis of Our Age

Available
Product Details
Price
$28.95  $26.92
Publisher
Greystone Books
Publish Date
Pages
272
Dimensions
6.0 X 9.0 X 0.9 inches | 0.9 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9781778401855

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About the Author

Akshat Rathi is an award-winning senior reporter for Bloomberg News and the host of Zero, a climate podcast for Bloomberg Green. He has a PhD in organic chemistry from the University of Oxford, and a BTech in chemical engineering from the Institute of Chemical Technology in Mumbai. He has worked for Quartz and The Economist. He lives in London, UK.

Reviews

"Climate innovation has accelerated far faster than many realize and by shining a spotlight on the solutions and innovators driving progress, Climate Capitalism is an important read for anyone in need of optimism about our ability to build a clean energy future."
--Bill Gates

"This encouraging book highlights the preponderance of positive developments regarding the efforts, worldwide, to deal with climate change....[A] refreshing take on the green revolution."
--Ed Meek, The Arts Fuse

"There is a cost to addressing climate change, but it will make us richer, happier, healthier, safer and more equal. Do we take the bargain? That is the animating question of Akshat Rathi's illuminating and incisive book, which offers the dazzling and deeply reported argument that the answer should be, overwhelmingly, yes."
--David Wallace-Wells, author of The Uninhabitable Earth and New York Times columnist

"Can our current unjust and destructive economic system be wrenched into alignment with the biosphere that supports us? Rathi shows this process beginning, and gives hope that we might make it work. An inspiring book!"
--Kim Stanley Robinson, author of The Ministry for the Future

"Few books on either climate or capitalism manage to be as insightful as they are readable, but Akshat Rathi cracks it. He delivers his powerful and hopeful message with both substance and style. These stories of courage, ingenuity and humanity will be told, and retold."
--Paul Polman, co-author of Net-Positive and former CEO of Unilever

"It's easy to feel fear or despair in the face of humanity's greatest challenge. Now thanks to policy and technology innovations, positive change is accelerating all around us. Akshat Rathi's brilliantly written account of some of those stories is an inspiration to keep going in a fight which we have no other option than to win."
--Baroness Bryony Worthington, member of the UK's House of Lords

"A superb, wide-ranging analysis of the green revolution sweeping the global economy, from one of the world's leading climate journalists."
--Simon Mundy, author of Race for Tomorrow

"Akshat Rathi's offers a unique perspective on the leaders driving a total transformation of everything around us. It's happening not just in rich, western countries, but as Akshat chronicles it's starting to happen everywhere and led by China."
--Tim Buckley, director of Clean Energy Finance

"It's cheaper than ever to fix, and much less expensive than protecting the status quo. Akshat Rathi guides us through the staggering innovations--and heroes--that make a clean energy future possible. This book provides a much-needed dose of optimism--based on data, not blind hope--that we can step up to the challenge."
--Hannah Ritchie, lead researcher for Our World In Data

"Akshat Rathi skillfully lays out the irony that capitalism may be the source of but also the solution to our climate change problems. Using examples of technologies and national plans, he shows how we need a new form of capitalism, where corporations, governments and people will have to align. It can be done."
--Rahul Tongia, senior fellow at the Centre for Social and Economic Progress

"'It's now cheaper to save the world than destroy it, ' writes Akshat Rathi in this bold new book. Give it to the doomsayer in your life."
--John Schwartz, journalism professor at University of Texas-Austin and veteran New York Times science and climate reporter