Chronology of the Evolution-Creationism Controversy

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Product Details

Price
$123.60
Publisher
Bloomsbury Publishing PLC
Publish Date
Pages
480
Dimensions
7.1 X 10.0 X 1.3 inches | 2.5 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9780313362873

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About the Author

Randy Moore, PhD, is H.T. Morse-Alumni Distinguished Teaching Professor of Biology at the University of Minnesota.

Mark Decker, PhD, is codirector of the biology program at the University of Minnesota.

Sehoya Cotner, PhD, is an award-winning teaching associate professor in the biology program and the Department of Ecology, Evolution, and Behavior at the University of Minnesota.

Reviews

"The modern controversy has roots that go far back in the history of human thought, contend Moore, Mark Decker, and Sehoya Cotner (all biology, U. of Minnesota-Minneapolis), and they begin in 2700 BCE in Egypt to trace some of the ideas and ways of thinking about the degree to which the physical world is self-contained. The chronology extends to 2009 and the discovery of what is now thought to be the oldest human remains. Marginal symbols indicate such categories as legislation and legal cases, argument from design and Intelligent Design, the age of earth, and social Darwinism and eugenics." --Reference & Research Book News

"This is an essential and frequently fascinating look at the long history of the evolution-creationism debate...it is a great introduction to the subject. Clearly written and easy to understand, the book is highly recommended for school, public, and academic libraries, as well as theological libraries with audiences interested in the topic." --Library Journal

"Useful for reference collections covering biology and or creationism." --Booklist

"This should prove a useful reference work for students and faculty and provide much useful material for those researching the issues. Summing Up: Highly recommended. Lower-level undergraduates and above; general readers." --Choice