Carry the One

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Product Details

Price
$15.00  $13.95
Publisher
Simon & Schuster
Publish Date
Pages
288
Dimensions
5.5 X 8.4 X 0.8 inches | 0.55 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781451656930
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

Carol Anshaw is the author of Right After the Weather, Carry the One, Aquamarine, Seven Moves, and Lucky in the Corner. She has received the Ferro-Grumley Award, the Carl Sandburg Award, and a National Book Critics Circle Citation for Excellence in Reviewing. She lives in Chicago and Amsterdam.

Reviews

"Carol Anshaw is one of those authors who should be a household name (in literature-loving homes, anyway). There's a good chance that her latest novel, "Carry the One", will make that happen . . . fine, eloquent."--"USA""Today"
"Splendid . . . seductive . . . vivid. . . . In sketches, landscapes, and erotic etchings, [Anshaw] carries not just one but all her characters through a quarter century of adulthood. And she makes the task look graceful."--"Entertainment Weekly", A
"Graceful and compassionate . . . Writing with rueful wit and a subtle understanding of the currents and passions that rule us, Anshaw demonstrates that struggling to do one's best, whatever the circumstances, makes for a life of consequence."--"People "magazine, 4 stars
"Beautifully observed . . . [Anshaw] intimately dissects how one event or choice can alter the trajectory of a life, how a fork in the road can lead to wholly unexpected and divergent outcomes . . . a resonate 'Big Chill'-like look at how time affects relationships. . . . Though the novel grapples with the many sadnesses of life . . . it does so with lyricism and humor. . . . We are pulled along by [Anshaw's] uncommon ability to describe just about anything. . . . As the years unfurl in this affecting novel, memories of the accident that took Casey Redman's life receed, but the fallout from that night has been internalized by everyone involved, invisibly shaping their outlook on the world, their feelings about love and responsibility and regret."--Michiko Kakutani, "The New York Times"
"Although""Anshaw has long been a literary milestone-maker, her pioneering is the least of her accomplishments. Anshaw is that rare, brilliant, witty writer whose prose is rich and buttery and whose plotting is as well-conceived and seamlessly executed as that of the most intricate thriller. Her psychological insights lend exceptional depth to her characters, who are so painfully and hilariously recognizable that we cannot turn from the familiarity of their circumstances and their flaws."--"Chicago Tribune"
"Superb."--"Financial Times"
"Provocative . . . her style is dead-on. What makes this a good book is the way the characters change and interact over time."--"Dallas Morning News"
"A brilliant feat of storytelling . . . one of the most intensely vibrant novels I've ever read. . . . This book is that kind of pearl."--Susan Straight, "The Boston Globe"
"Compulsively readable . . . subtle and seductive . . . a novel with the sweep of a family saga and the compressed gleam of a short story."--"Cleveland Plain Dealer"
"Moving and engaging . . . funny, smart and closely observed . . . explores the way tragedy can follow hard on celebration, binding people together even more lastingly than passion. . . . Anshaw gives readers the reward of paying close attention to ordinary people as [she] illuminates flawed, likeable characters with sympathy and truth."--Sylvia Brownrigg", The New York Times Book Review"
"If you love Jonathan Franzen, you'll love this compelling book."--"Entertainment Weekly" (Bullseye)
"Sentence by intelligent sentence, the novelist makes . . . us feel the remorse and joy and fears much more sharply than we can sometimes know those same emotions in the lives of our closest siblings or friends or even in ourselves. . . . Carol Anshaw gets under the skin of her characters and under the reader's, as well."--Alan Cheuse, NPR's "All Things Considered"