Bricks & Mortals: Ten Great Buildings and the People They Made

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Product Details

Price
$30.00
Publisher
Bloomsbury Publishing PLC
Publish Date
Pages
352
Dimensions
6.35 X 9.56 X 1.0 inches | 0.01 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9781620406298

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About the Author

Tom Wilkinson teaches at University College London. He has lectured on the history of art and architecture at the Courtauld Gallery and the University of Oxford. He has lived in Shanghai and Berlin, and speaks Chinese and German. He presently lives in London.

Reviews

"[A] rich, centuries-spanning tour of great buildings." - "The Boston Globe"
"A stunning antidote [to] conventional histories... Wilkinson's writing is informed by an astonishing breadth of knowledge... Solid doses of architectural history are enriched by an engrossing array of stories, meditations and historical contexts that humanize the buildings. One of the delights in reading Wilkinson is a sense of boundlessness and discovery on every page... "Bricks and Mortals" provides a chance to travel the world with a guide of uncommon wisdom and talent to discover how buildings make us who we are." - "Buffalo News "
"A witty, erudite narrator not shy about inserting his opinions, Wilkinson draws on his extensive knowledge of art, literature, history urban planning, sociology, and culture to explore the intimate relationship between architecture and society." - "Publishers Weekly "
"[A] wide-ranging and stimulating new book... This thought-provoking exploration of different kinds of architecture helps us better understand something we often take for granted or consider too specialized." - "BookPage"
""Bricks and Mortals" is likely to make readers more conscious of the structures they inhabit, work in and experience daily A thought-provoking book." - "Economist""
"A stunning antidote [to] conventional histories Wilkinson's writing is informed by an astonishing breadth of knowledge Solid doses of architectural history are enriched by an engrossing array of stories, meditations and historical contexts that humanize the buildings. One of the delights in reading Wilkinson is a sense of boundlessness and discovery on every page "Bricks and Mortals" provides a chance to travel the world with a guide of uncommon wisdom and talent to discover how buildings make us who we are." - "Buffalo News ""
"[A] combination of perceptive architectural observation and licentious historical analysis Wilkinson has looked at buildings honestly and can write about them well. What he wants, I think, is to provoke readers into thinking of architecture as a subject concerned with much more than stones and proportions, famous names and revered monuments." - "New Republic ""
"A lively combination of scholarship, cultural history and sharp-tongued social commentary about our buildings A scholarly but swiftly flowing text that glistens with attitude." - "Kirkus Reviews""
"A rich, thoughtful and insightful inquiry into why buildings should be built first and foremost for people. His prose is smart, witty and opinionated As he easily jumps from architecture to popular culture to philosophy to history, Wilkinson's stimulating critical inquiries reveal an engaged social conscience. Outstanding." - "Shelf Awareness""
"[A] wide-ranging and stimulating new book This thought-provoking exploration of different kinds of architecture helps us better understand something we often take for granted or consider too specialized." - "BookPage""

[A] rich, centuries-spanning tour of great buildings. "The Boston Globe"

"Bricks and Mortals" is likely to make readers more conscious of the structures they inhabit, work in and experience daily A thought-provoking book. "Economist"

A stunning antidote [to] conventional histories Wilkinson's writing is informed by an astonishing breadth of knowledge Solid doses of architectural history are enriched by an engrossing array of stories, meditations and historical contexts that humanize the buildings. One of the delights in reading Wilkinson is a sense of boundlessness and discovery on every page "Bricks and Mortals" provides a chance to travel the world with a guide of uncommon wisdom and talent to discover how buildings make us who we are. "Buffalo News"

[A] combination of perceptive architectural observation and licentious historical analysis Wilkinson has looked at buildings honestly and can write about them well. What he wants, I think, is to provoke readers into thinking of architecture as a subject concerned with much more than stones and proportions, famous names and revered monuments. "New Republic"

A witty, erudite narrator not shy about inserting his opinions, Wilkinson draws on his extensive knowledge of art, literature, history urban planning, sociology, and culture to explore the intimate relationship between architecture and society. "Publishers Weekly"

A lively combination of scholarship, cultural history and sharp-tongued social commentary about our buildings A scholarly but swiftly flowing text that glistens with attitude. "Kirkus Reviews"

A rich, thoughtful and insightful inquiry into why buildings should be built first and foremost for people. His prose is smart, witty and opinionated As he easily jumps from architecture to popular culture to philosophy to history, Wilkinson's stimulating critical inquiries reveal an engaged social conscience. Outstanding. "Shelf Awareness"

[A] wide-ranging and stimulating new book This thought-provoking exploration of different kinds of architecture helps us better understand something we often take for granted or consider too specialized. "BookPage""

[A] rich, centuries-spanning tour of great buildings. The Boston Globe

Bricks and Mortals is likely to make readers more conscious of the structures they inhabit, work in and experience daily A thought-provoking book. Economist

A stunning antidote [to] conventional histories Wilkinson's writing is informed by an astonishing breadth of knowledge Solid doses of architectural history are enriched by an engrossing array of stories, meditations and historical contexts that humanize the buildings. One of the delights in reading Wilkinson is a sense of boundlessness and discovery on every page Bricks and Mortals provides a chance to travel the world with a guide of uncommon wisdom and talent to discover how buildings make us who we are. Buffalo News

[A] combination of perceptive architectural observation and licentious historical analysis Wilkinson has looked at buildings honestly and can write about them well. What he wants, I think, is to provoke readers into thinking of architecture as a subject concerned with much more than stones and proportions, famous names and revered monuments. New Republic

A witty, erudite narrator not shy about inserting his opinions, Wilkinson draws on his extensive knowledge of art, literature, history urban planning, sociology, and culture to explore the intimate relationship between architecture and society. Publishers Weekly

A lively combination of scholarship, cultural history and sharp-tongued social commentary about our buildings A scholarly but swiftly flowing text that glistens with attitude. Kirkus Reviews

A rich, thoughtful and insightful inquiry into why buildings should be built first and foremost for people. His prose is smart, witty and opinionated As he easily jumps from architecture to popular culture to philosophy to history, Wilkinson's stimulating critical inquiries reveal an engaged social conscience. Outstanding. Shelf Awareness

[A] wide-ranging and stimulating new book This thought-provoking exploration of different kinds of architecture helps us better understand something we often take for granted or consider too specialized. BookPage

"

"[A] rich, centuries-spanning tour of great buildings." --The Boston Globe

"Bricks and Mortals is likely to make readers more conscious of the structures they inhabit, work in and experience daily... A thought-provoking book." --Economist

"A stunning antidote [to] conventional histories... Wilkinson's writing is informed by an astonishing breadth of knowledge... Solid doses of architectural history are enriched by an engrossing array of stories, meditations and historical contexts that humanize the buildings. One of the delights in reading Wilkinson is a sense of boundlessness and discovery on every page... Bricks and Mortals provides a chance to travel the world with a guide of uncommon wisdom and talent to discover how buildings make us who we are." --Buffalo News

"[A] combination of perceptive architectural observation and licentious historical analysis ...Wilkinson has looked at buildings honestly and can write about them well. What he wants, I think, is to provoke readers into thinking of architecture as a subject concerned with much more than stones and proportions, famous names and revered monuments." --New Republic

"A witty, erudite narrator not shy about inserting his opinions, Wilkinson draws on his extensive knowledge of art, literature, history urban planning, sociology, and culture to explore the intimate relationship between architecture and society." --Publishers Weekly

"A lively combination of scholarship, cultural history and sharp-tongued social commentary about our buildings... A scholarly but swiftly flowing text that glistens with attitude." --Kirkus Reviews

"A rich, thoughtful and insightful inquiry into why buildings should be built first and foremost for people. His prose is smart, witty and opinionated... As he easily jumps from architecture to popular culture to philosophy to history, Wilkinson's stimulating critical inquiries reveal an engaged social conscience. Outstanding." --Shelf Awareness

"[A] wide-ranging and stimulating new book... This thought-provoking exploration of different kinds of architecture helps us better understand something we often take for granted or consider too specialized." --BookPage