Boricua Pop: Puerto Ricans and the Latinization of American Culture

Available

Product Details

Price
$34.50
Publisher
New York University Press
Publish Date
Pages
337
Dimensions
5.9 X 8.9 X 0.9 inches | 1.1 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9780814758182

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About the Author

Frances Negron-Muntaner is an award-winning filmmaker, writer, journalist, and cultural critic. She is the co-editor of Puerto Rican Jam and author of Anatomy of a Smile. She currently teaches at Columbia University and lives in New York City.

Reviews

"Provocative and broad-ranging . . . This eclectic, always interesting work will be certain to elicit discussion among faculty and students of ethnic studies, US popular culture, and Puerto Rican and Latino studies."--Choice
"A brilliant intervention in the culture and politics of Latinos in the United States. Important, timely, and innovative, Boricua Pop is a stellar addition to a body of work that grows in importance over time. Negron-Muntaner's book is eagerly anticipated."--Jose Quiroga, author of Tropics of Desire
"Frances Negron-Muntaner is a challenging and provocative scholar whose multi-focal positionings turn the Puerto Rican process of colonization and migration into a fascinating transcultural hologram. Boricua Pop is a foundational text in American, Latino/a, Queer, Performance, and Cultural Studies."--Alberto Sandoval-Sanchez, Mount Holyoke College
"Important, timely, and innovative, Boricua Pop is a stellar addition to a body of work that grows in importance over time. Negron-Muntaner's book is eagerly anticipated."--Jose Quiroga, author of Tropics of Desire
"A perspicacious new book and one of the most intellectually exciting works of recent years, Boricua Pop: Puerto Ricans and the latinization of American Culture gives new meaning to the idea of the pleasure of the text"--QBR
"Mixing the down and dirty with high culture to come up with good look at the transculture effects of it all."--San Juan Star