Astoria to Zion: Twenty-Six Stories of Risk and Abandon from Ecotone's First Decade

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Product Details

Price
$18.95  $17.62
Publisher
Lookout Books
Publish Date
Pages
412
Dimensions
5.5 X 1.1 X 8.5 inches | 1.1 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9780984900091
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

Lauren Groff is the author of four novels: Matrix, forthcoming in September 2021, and the National Book Award Finalist and winner of the American Booksellers Association's Fiction prize, Fates and Furies; as well as Arcadia and The Monsters of Templeton. Her story collections include Florida, winner of The Story Prize and finalist for the National Book Award, and Delicate Edible Birds. She has been twice been a finalist for the Kirkus Prize, as well as for the National Book Critics Circle Award, the LA Times Book Prize, and the Orange Prize for New Writers. She was a Guggenheim fellow and was named one of Granta's 2017 Best Young American Novelists. Her work has been featured in The New Yorker, The Atlantic, and Harper's, in five Best American Short Stories anthologies, and her books have been published in over thirty languages. She lives in Gainesville, Florida, with her husband and sons.
Steve Almond is the author of eleven books of fiction and nonfiction, including the New York Times bestsellers Candyfreak and Against Football. His essays and reviews have been published in venues ranging from the New York Times Magazine to Ploughshares to Poets & Writers, and his short fiction has appeared in Best American Short Stories, The Pushcart Prize, Best American Mysteries, and Best American Erotica. Almond is the recipient of grants from the Massachusetts Cultural Council and the National Endowment for the Arts. He cohosted the Dear Sugars podcast with his pal Cheryl Strayed for four years, and teaches Creative Writing at the Neiman Fellowship at Harvard and Wesleyan. He lives in Arlington, Massachusetts, with his family and his anxiety.

Rick Bass is a writer and environmental activist. Bass won the Story Prize for books published in 2016 for his collection of new and selected stories, For a Little While. He was a finalist for the Story Prize in 2006 for his short story collection The Lives of Rocks. He was a finalist for the 2008 National Book Critics Circle Award (autobiography) for Why I Came West. He was also awarded the General Electric Younger Writers Award, a PEN/Nelson Algren Award Special Citation for fiction, and a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship.

Rebecca Makkai is the Chicago-based author of the story collection Music for Wartime, as well as the novels The Hundred-Year House and The Borrower. Her short fiction has been published in The Best American Short Stories, Harper's, Tin House, Ploughshares, and featured on National Public Radio's This American Life and Selected Shorts. Her most recent novel, The Great Believers, was published by Viking Books in June 2018.

Edith Pearlman's new and selected story collection, Binocular Vision, won the National Book Critics Circle Award and was a finalist for the National Book Award as well as the Los Angeles Times Book Prize and the Story Prize. The author of three other story collections, including the New York Times bestseller Honeydew, she has also received the PEN/Malamud Award for excellence in the short story. Her widely admired stories have been reprinted numerous times in The Best American Short Stories, The O. Henry Prize Stories, and The Pushcart Prize. A New Englander by both birth and preference, Pearlman lives with her husband in Brookline, Massachusetts.

Ron Rash is the author of the 2009 PEN/Faulkner finalist and New York Times bestseller Serena and Above the Waterfall, in addition to four prizewinning novels, including The Cove, One Foot in Eden, Saints at the River, and The World Made Straight; four collections of poems; and six collections of stories, among them Burning Bright, which won the 2010 Frank O'Connor International Short Story Award, and Chemistry and Other Stories, which was a finalist for the 2007 PEN/Faulkner Award. Twice the recipient of the O. Henry Prize, he teaches at Western Carolina University.

Ben Fountain was born in Chapel Hill and grew up in the tobacco country of eastern North Carolina. A former practicing attorney, he is the author of Brief Encounters with Che Guevara, which won the PEN/Hemingway Award and the Barnes & Noble Discover Award for Fiction, and the novel Billy Lynn's Long Halftime Walk, winner of the National Book Critics' Circle Award and a finalist for the National Book Award. Billy Lynn was adapted into a feature film directed by three-time Oscar winner Ang Lee, and his work has been translated into over twenty languages. His series of essays published in The Guardian on the 2016 U.S. presidential election was subsequently nominated by the editors of The Guardian for the Pulitzer Prize in Commentary. He lives in Dallas, Texas with his wife of 32 years, Sharon Fountain.

Reviews

"A killer short-story collection" --Gina Webb, Atlanta Journal Constitution

"A superb anthology that showcases short fiction by emerging and established writers. Twenty-six tales tightrope between defined and amorphous states, while characters go to extremes to test their agendas and circumstances both ordinary and bizarre . . . The breadth of the selected tales creates a satisfying and often enthralling collection that perfectly celebrates Ecotone's first decade." --Booklist

"There is a certain digital anxiety being acted out in this collection of fiction from Ecotone magazine's first decade, as well as a feeling of urgency, as if the need for a short story must be argued for here and now, guided by Ecotone's mission to reimagine the idea of place . . . The stories in Astoria to Zion recognize and struggle with the draw of the screen, which makes them all the more interesting and timely." --Harvard Review

"Astoria to Zion is a dazzling literary showcase of veterans and new voices, which offers all that readers have come to expect from Ecotone. While conjuring and exploring wildly varied places, this collection stakes out a stellar one of its own." --Jill McCorkle, author of Life After Life

"These stories care deeply about the physical world--sea, fire, city, countryside--but their concerns also press into every corner of existence--politics, love, regret, ambition. Heirs to Whitman, the collective voices are beautiful, soulful, crushing, and intelligent." --Rebecca Lee, author of Bobcat

"I started to say what a stellar and concentrated selection of stories compose this fine book, stories full of all of our hope and danger and unease, but I'm just going to offer this simple note: this is a book I'll hand to my friends when they want to know where the short story is thriving." --Ron Carlson, author of Return to Oakpine

"This collection is an emporium of sublime notions, glittering delights, and daredevil marvels. Twenty-six stories, each fantastically conceived and sensuously wrought, burnished and durable; a superb anthology, not to be missed." --Melissa Pritchard, author of Palmerino