Anatomy of a War: Vietnam, the United States, and the Modern Historical Experience

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Product Details
Price
$19.95  $18.55
Publisher
New Press
Publish Date
Pages
688
Dimensions
6.14 X 9.22 X 1.79 inches | 2.06 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781565842182

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About the Author

Gabriel Kolko (1932-2014) was Distinguished Research Professor Emeritus at York University in Toronto. He was the author of Anatomy of War, Century of War, and Another Century of War?, all available from The New Press.

Reviews
"A book that goes far beyond the ambitions of earlier writers by synthesizing the difficult story of United States intervention with the yet more complicated internal dynamic of the Vietnamese Revolution. A stylish, passionate, stimulating, and provocative work that needs to be read by anyone concerned about the overweening role of the United States in the world." --Richard Gott, Manchester Guardian

"This is one of the most comprehensive examinations of the Vietnam war yet written. Gabriel Kolko has gone far beyond the obvious military, political, and economic aspects of the war to explore in-depth causative factors leading to the end result. . . . Of interest to anyone wishing to study the Vietnam War in all of its ramifications." --Military Review

"For those seriously interested in understanding the underlying political and social structures that predetermined significant elements of the Vietnam War--social structures that the U.S. government chose to ignore--reading this book is an absolute necessity. There is simply no other book of its scope available today, and there is not likely to be another like it for a long time." --Martin J. Sherwin, Dartmouth College

"Kolko's grand synthesis deftly balances the three sides in the protracted struggle: the Communist Party, the Republic of Vietnam, and the U.S. . . . This meticulously documented work will become a pivotal starting point for all future discussion of the Vietnam War." --Kirkus Reviews