An Imperfect Geometry

(Author) (Preface by)
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Product Details
Price
$18.00
Publisher
Alliteration LLC
Publish Date
Pages
182
Dimensions
5.5 X 8.5 X 0.42 inches | 0.52 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9798985266696
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About the Author
Myriam Moscona is from Mexico, of Bulgarian Sephardic descent. She is the author of nine books, from Ultimo jardín (1983) to De par en par (2009). Two of her published books are outside the realm of poetry, yet remain connected to poetry: De frente y de perfil (literary portraits of 75 Mexican poets) and De par en par, which explores the phenomenon of poetry beyond its traditional construction. When NEGRO MARFIL was conceived, Moscona focused on the use of visual materials (inks, pastels, graphite and acrylics), which led her to explore alternate means of expression. In this way she came to visual poetry: drawn in through the side doors of writing. Moscona has received numerous awards, including the Premio de Poesía Aguascalientes and the Premio Nacional de Traducción; she is a grantee of the Sistema Nacional de Creadores de Arte, and she was awarded a grant from the Guggenheim Foundation.
Robin Myers is a poet, essayist, and translator. Among her recent publications are Cars on Fire by Mónica Ramón Ríos (Open Letter, 2020), The Restless Dead by Cristina Rivera Garza (Vanderbilt University Press, 2020), and The Science of Departures by Adalber Salas Hernández (Kenning Editions, 2021). Forthcoming translations include The Book of Explanations by Tedi López Mills (Deep Vellum), Bariloche by Andrés Neuman (Open Letter), Copy by Dolores Dorantes (Wave), and Tonight: The Great Earthquake by Leonardo Teja (PANK Books). She was a winner of the 2019 Poems in Translation Contest (Words Without Borders/Academy of American Poets). Robin's poems have appeared in Yale Review, Poetry Northwest, Washington Square Review, Massachusetts Review, and elsewhere. She lives in Mexico City, where she is working on a book of essays about translating poetry and a collection of poems.