Adorno's Negative Dialectic: Philosophy and the Possibility of Critical Rationality (Revised)

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Product Details
Price
$36.00
Publisher
MIT Press
Publish Date
Pages
224
Dimensions
6.1 X 9.06 X 0.49 inches | 0.69 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9780262651080

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About the Author
Brian O'Connor is Senior Lecturer in the School of Philosophy at University College Dublin.
Reviews
--Tom Huhn, School of Visual Arts, New York
--J. M. Bernstein, author of "Adorno: Disenchantment and Ethics"
--Simon Jarvis, University of Cambridge, author of "Adorno: A Critical Introduction"
" Brian O'Connor has produced an elegant and persuasive defense of the epistemological core of Adorno's philosophy: the priority of the object for the possibility of experience. His analysis of Adorno's transcendental strategy is novel and challenging. An invaluable contribution to Adorno studies." --J. M. Bernstein, author of "Adorno: Disenchantment and Ethics"
" Brian O'Connor has crafted a timely and robust contribution to the ongoing reception of Adorno's work. He provides a much needed and exceedingly lucid treatment of Adorno's central concerns with the nature of the object of experience and the shape of subjectivity, with specific reference to the achievements of Kant and Hegel, around and within which Adorno situated his own project." --Tom Huhn, School of Visual Arts, New York
" O'Connor takes Adorno seriously as a philosopher, rather than regarding the philosophy as a mere epiphenomenon of the social theory. Taking full account of important recent work in German, he also brings a clear and analytical intelligence to the dissection and reconstruction of some of Adorno's central arguments. O'Connor's study makes Adorno's vital and detailed contributions to epistemology and metaphysics harder than ever to ignore." --Simon Jarvis, University of Cambridge, author of "Adorno: A Critical Introduction"
& quot; Brian O'Connor has produced an elegant and persuasive defense of the epistemological core of Adorno's philosophy: the priority of the object for the possibility of experience. His analysis of Adorno's transcendental strategy is novel and challenging. An invaluable contribution to Adorno studies.& quot; --J. M. Bernstein, author of Adorno: Disenchantment and Ethics
& quot; Brian O'Connor has crafted a timely and robust contribution to the ongoing reception of Adorno's work. He provides a much needed and exceedingly lucid treatment of Adorno's central concerns with the nature of the object of experience and the shape of subjectivity, with specific reference to the achievements of Kant and Hegel, around and within which Adorno situated his own project.& quot; --Tom Huhn, School of Visual Arts, New York
& quot; O'Connor takes Adorno seriously as a philosopher, rather than regarding the philosophy as a mere epiphenomenon of the social theory. Taking full account of important recent work in German, he also brings a clear and analytical intelligence to the dissection and reconstruction of some of Adorno's central arguments. O'Connor's study makes Adorno's vital and detailed contributions to epistemology and metaphysics harder than ever to ignore.& quot; --Simon Jarvis, University of Cambridge, author of Adorno: A Critical Introduction
"O'Connor takes Adorno seriously as a philosopher, rather than regarding the philosophy as a mere epiphenomenon of the social theory. Taking full account of important recent work in German, he also brings a clear and analytical intelligence to the dissection and reconstruction of some of Adorno's central arguments. O'Connor's study makes Adorno's vital and detailed contributions to epistemology and metaphysics harder than ever to ignore."--Simon Jarvis, University of Cambridge, author of "Adorno: A Critical Introduction"
"Brian O'Connor has produced an elegant and persuasive defense of the epistemological core of Adorno's philosophy: the priority of the object for the possibility of experience. His analysis of Adorno's transcendental strategy is novel and challenging. An invaluable contribution to Adorno studies."--J. M. Bernstein, author of "Adorno: Disenchantment and Ethics"
"Brian O'Connor has crafted a timely and robust contribution to the ongoing reception of Adorno's work. He provides a much needed and exceedingly lucid treatment of Adorno's central concerns with the nature of the object of experience and the shape of subjectivity, with specific reference to the achievements of Kant and Hegel, around and within which Adorno situated his own project."--Tom Huhn, School of Visual Arts, New York