A Thousand Times More Fair: What Shakespeare's Plays Teach Us about Justice

Available

Product Details

Price
$15.99
Publisher
Ecco Press
Publish Date
Pages
320
Dimensions
5.34 X 8.03 X 0.87 inches | 0.52 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9780061769122
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

Kenji Yoshino is the Chief Justice Earl Warren Professor of Constitutional Law at NYU School of Law and the faculty director of the Meltzer Center for Diversity, Inclusion, and Belonging. Kenji studied at Harvard, Oxford, and Yale Law School. His fields are constitutional law, antidiscrimination law, and law and literature. He has received several distinctions for his teaching and research, including the American Bar Association's Silver Gavel Award, the Peck Medal in Jurisprudence, and New York University's Distinguished Teaching Award. Kenji is the author of three previous books--Covering: The Hidden Assault on Our Civil Rights; A Thousand Times More Fair: What Shakespeare's Plays Teach Us About Justice; and Speak Now: Marriage Equality on Trial. He has published in major academic journals, including the Harvard Law Review, the Stanford Law Review, and the Yale Law Journal, as well as popular venues such as the Los Angeles Times, The New York Times, and The Washington Post. He serves on the board of the Brennan Center for Justice, advisory boards for diversity and inclusion at Charter Communications and Morgan Stanley, and on the board of his children's school.

Reviews

"Neither a prosecutor nor a defense lawyer herein, Yoshino is a refreshingly engaging advocate for Shakespeare."--Newark Star Ledger
"Fascinating. . . . Loaded with perceptive and provocative comments on Shakespeare's plots, characters, and contemporary analogs."--Justice John Paul Stevens, Supreme Court of the United States
"[W]ell-informed by scholarship, nuanced and appealingly written. . . . [P]erhaps the most enlightening study of the subject to appear in a century."--Charlotte Observer
"Who knew that there was such a brilliant and fresh reading of Shakespeare waiting to be discovered? Only Kenji Yoshino, with a poet's ear for language and a lawyer's passion for justice, could have done it."--Carol Gilligan, University Professor, NYU
"The ingenious and well-argued premise of Kenji Yoshino's new book is that justice in a form that we can understand and relate to modern concepts of legal justice is a pervasive theme of Shakespearean drama. . . . Shakespeare, in law as in so much else, remains our contemporary."--Judge Richard A. Posner
"Until Kenji Yoshino's book, I had found little of value in 'Law and Literature' studies. He redeems the mode. Shakespeare, most capacious of souls, is shown by Yoshino to illuminate the vast and complex structures that must inform the role of law in our struggle for a just society."--Harold Bloom, author of SHAKESPEARE: THE INVENTION OF THE HUMAN
"Kenji Yoshino brings to his lively reading of the plays the full force of his passionate brooding on issues of justice in contemporary society. A THOUSAND TIMES MORE FAIR will appeal to anyone interested in the uses of great art to reflect on some of our culture's most vexing problems."--Stephen Greenblatt, author of WILL IN THE WORLD
"Readers will find Yoshino provocative, often controversial, and Shakespeare, as always, entertaining."--Publishers Weekly
"A sensitive and lively mind work[s] its way through the legal themes in some of the most beautiful passages in English literature."--New Republic
"A remarkably imaginative and scholarly work. It reminds us that in Shakespeare's time, like our own, the law and ideas of justice were in flux."--California Lawyer
"In the enlightening and readable A Thousand Times More Fair, author Kenji Yoshino opens a window on Shakespearean dramaturgy and scholarship and lets in a breath of fresh air."--New York Journal of Books
"[An] insightful inquiry into the contemporary relevance of the Bard's vision of justice. . . . A refreshing reminder that questions of justice may lead to dramatic poetry, not legal jargon."--Booklist (starred review)