A Natural History of Shells

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Product Details
Price
$17.95  $16.69
Publisher
Princeton University Press
Publish Date
Pages
236
Dimensions
5.43 X 8.27 X 0.71 inches | 0.65 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9780691229249

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About the Author
Geerat J. Vermeij is Distinguished Professor of Earth and Planetary Sciences at the University of California, Davis. He is the author of The Evolutionary World: How Adaptation Explains Everything from Seashells to Civilization; Privileged Hands: A Scientific Life; Nature: An Economic History (Princeton); and Evolution and Escalation: An Ecological History of Life (Princeton).
Reviews
"Vermeij provides an elegantly written and beautifully illustrated account of shell construction, function and evolution, while showing how these molluscan houses give us insights into ecology and the history of life. A book that will be treasured by scientists and lay readers alike."-- "Nature"
"A fascinating biological view of shells as the products of living organisms. . . . We come to appreciate and understand the diverse wonders of economy, function and construction that can be seen in shells."---Douglas Palmer, New Scientist
"This is a pleasingly different book. Most other popular books on shells help one to identify them. In this book Vermeij uses shells to help understand the ecology, evolution, and history of snails, clams, and other Mollusca, the phylum of animals that construct 'shells.' . . . This book uses both contemporary and fossil shells to explore many ideas and processes in general biology. . . . I have been seeking this book for years."-- "Quarterly Review of Biology"
"I was swept away by the world of molluscs and found myself fascinated and informed. . . . By the end of the book I was convinced that anyone with a passion for their subject would enjoy and be educated by Vermeij's obvious passion for his."-- "Biologist"