A History of the Book in America: Volume 4: Print in Motion: The Expansion of Publishing and Reading in the United States, 1880-1940

Backorder (temporarily out of stock)

Product Details

Price
$63.25
Publisher
University of North Carolina Press
Publish Date
Pages
688
Dimensions
6.14 X 9.21 X 1.51 inches | 2.29 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781469621623

Earn by promoting books

Earn money by sharing your favorite books through our Affiliate program.

Become an affiliate

About the Author

Carl F. Kaestle is University Professor Emeritus in the Departments of Education, History, and Public Policy at Brown University. He is author or editor of six books, including Literacy in the United States: Readers and Reading since 1880. Janice A. Radway is professor of literature at Duke University. She is author or editor of four books, including Reading the Romance: Women, Patriarchy, and Popular Literature and A Feeling for Books: The Book-of-the-Month Club, Literary Taste, and Middle-Class Desire (both from the University of North Carolina Press).

Reviews

This superb collection proves that the history of print culture, when smartly done, is the history of American culture.--The Journal of American History


[Kaestle and Radway's] careful editorial hand is evident in the execution as well as the planning of this volume.--The Library


Eminently measuring up to the superior standard set by the previously issued volumes, Print in Motion is noteworthy not only for the light it sheds on the history of the book, but for the skill with which its contributors set that history in the context of its times. . . . An engrossing narration that will stand for many years as the definitive history of the book in the United States. Persons interested in this subject are encouraged to acquire all five volumes.--Library & Information History


What the History of the Book series shows so clearly is that the world we know, the communities to which we already belong, are reified and reinforced by books. Such is the incredible and incredibly flexible power of this primitive technology. Behold the book: It is limited but perfect.--Humanities magazine


A model of scholarly publication and institutional cooperation. . . . A timely achievement and a great one. . . . Without university presses, we would still be waiting for HBA.--Journal of Scholarly Publishing