BuzzFeed Book Club

By BuzzFeed

By BuzzFeed

Join the BuzzFeed community’s most avid readers as we dive into one new book each month. Sign up here!

Catherine House

Elisabeth Thomas

$27.99 $25.19

This dark, speculative thriller is about a prestigious school (though even that label doesn’t cut it: “No, it wasn’t a college, exactly ... Let’s say, a community of minds”) that offers free tuition plus room and board to students who, in return, essentially cut themselves off from the outside world for the three years they are enrolled. Ines, our narrator, is more than happy to leave a past trauma behind her, and isn’t eager to get out into the real world — but the further she gets in her Catherine House education, the more apparent it becomes there’s something sinister underneath it. It’s an electrifying update on gothic horror, evoking haunting institutional imagery and weaving in “psychosexual” experimentation and power imbalances.

Anna K: A Love Story

Jenny Lee

$18.99 $17.47

Anna K is a YA retelling of Tolstoy's Anna Karenina: Seventeen-year-old Anna K. seems to have it all — the perfect boyfriend, a life of opulence, and the pride of her Korean American father (among siblings weathering multiple scandals and dramas). But when she meets and quickly falls for notorious playboy Alexia "Count" Vronsky, her life is turned upside down.

Chosen Ones: The New Novel from New York Times Best-Selling Author Veronica Roth

Veronica Roth

$26.99 $24.29

Chosen Ones is a smart, nimble story about what happens after those chosen to save the world actually do it. In this case, the superheroes are five disillusioned twentysomethings struggling to find the normalcy they granted the rest of the world when they destroyed the Dark One. But when one of the chosen five dies on the 10th anniversary of the evil’s defeat, the survivors suspect the worst — that perhaps they aren’t actually rid of the Dark One.

Barn 8

Deb Olin Unferth

$16.00 $14.72

Unferth’s eco-heist story is inventive, but accessible; uncompromising in its critique of the agricultural-industrial complex, but also a whole lot of fun. In Janey, Cleveland, Dill, and Annabelle — two auditors for the US egg industry, two animal rights activists — Unferth has created a band of misfit reluctant radicals who come together to pull off a seemingly impossible scheme: stealing a million chickens from a local farm. Through their chaotic adventure — and an exploration of the life events that brought each character to it — Unferth injects humanity and heart into the dilemma of consumption in a capitalist society, making very clear the consequences of moving forward with blinders on.

The Third Rainbow Girl: The Long Life of a Double Murder in Appalachia

Emma Copley Eisenberg

$27.00 $24.30

Half investigation of the Rainbow Murders and all of the complicated cultural forces surrounding it, and half memoir of Eisenberg's coming-of-age as a queer woman in a county and state that has long been dismissed and misunderstood. It's a potent, fascinating, deeply thoughtful read.

Such a Fun Age

Kiley Reid

$26.00 $23.40

Reid’s much-discussed debut examines the relationship between a wealthy white couple and their young and broke black babysitter, Emira. Reid shows the uncomfortable ways that relationship strains and how the couple’s good intentions are challenged after Emira is accused of kidnapping the couple’s daughter while shopping with her one night. It’s a canny, scintillating, and deeply thoughtful exploration of race, class, and privilege.

Nothing to See Here

Kevin Wilson

$26.99 $24.29

When deadbeat Lillian agrees to play governess to her rich best friend’s twin stepchildren (who happen to spontaneously burst into flames) she has no idea what she’s doing, and certainly has no understanding that it could profoundly change her. But it does — and this small, weird, quasi-family’s summer together is equal parts hilarious and moving.

All This Could Be Yours

Jami Attenberg

$26.00 $23.40

A family that isn’t exactly devastated by the death of their patriarch is an intriguing family indeed in Attenberg’s latest novel, set in New Orleans. An easy-to-read book about a complicated family — Attenberg’s area of expertise.

Frankly in Love

David Yoon

$18.98 $17.46

Frank Li is a Korean-American high school senior who feels stuck between what he wants and how to live up to the expectations of his parents, especially their one rule of dating: "Date Korean." This proves to be a problem when Frank falls for Brit Means, who is incredibly smart and pretty, but also white. His family friend Joy Song is in a similar situation, so they make a pact. They'll pretend to date each other so they earn more freedom to be with their real significant others. It's a perfect plan — right? Yoon's stellar debut expertly and authentically tackles racism, privilege, and characters who are trying to navigate their Korean-American identity.

The World According to Fannie Davis: My Mother's Life in the Detroit Numbers

Bridgett M Davis

$16.99 $15.63

This is a phenomenal TRUE story of a woman who ran an illegal lottery business that catapulted her family from Jim Crow poverty to middle class riches.

Daisy Jones & the Six

Taylor Jenkins Reid

$17.00 $15.64

Coming of age in 1960s Los Angeles, Daisy is a girl with a killer voice and big rock-and-roll dreams. Billy Dunne is the lead singer of up and coming band The Six. After a chance encounter and the vision of a producer, Daisy Jones and the Six is born, creating something so amazing, it'll go down in rock and roll history.

Trust Exercise

Susan Choi

$27.00 $24.30

When Stanley Huang discovers he's dying of pancreatic cancer, and his family — wife, ex-wife, children, and grandchildren — come together to prepare, two questions linger among them: Is he really as rich as he's always boasted? And how much of that wealth will be mine? It's a story of trust in both senses of the word, and Wang guides us effortlessly through that intertwining mess of love and resentment that only family can create. She does so against the backdrop of Silicon Valley wealth and pretensions, perfectly skewering its (and our) culture of excess.

Just Kids

Patti Smith

$16.98 $15.62

Patti Smith's iconic memoir Just Kids is a poignant recounting of Patti's once-in-a-lifetime relationship with photographer Robert Mapplethorpe in the heady days of New York City in the late '60s and '70s. It's an inspirational and insightful story about friendship, ambition, and art — about the journey toward figuring out who you are, and all of the people who help you along the way.

Rough Magic: Riding the World's Loneliest Horse Race

Lara Prior-Palmer

$25.00 $22.50

While killing time on the internet when she was just 19 years old, Lara Prior-Palmer landed on a website about “the world’s longest, toughest horse race” — and though she’d never heard of it before that day, and had no qualifications other than a love of horses and great drive, she decided to enter. The decision is impulsive but not surprising; Prior-Palmer describes her tendency to question norms and invite chaos. This energy propels her through the race — 10 days on 25 ponies, over 1,000 kilometers of Mongolian grassland — and though it's easy to judge her for her naiveté, her humility and earnest drive make it impossible not to root for her. The journey is absolutely riveting.

The Bird King

G Willow Wilson

$16.00 $14.72

This sprawling, fantastical novel takes place during the reign of the last sultan of Muslim Iberia, focusing on a concubine named Fatima and her best friend Hassan. The two have a dangerous secret — Hassan, the palace mapmaker, can draw maps that bend reality — and when Fatima accidentally reveals this to a woman from the newly formed Spanish monarchy, she puts her and Hassan's lives at risk. Wilson describes their escape from the palace and their subsequent journey through the country — trying to elude the Inquisition with the help of a wry jinn — with heart and humor, weaving in an ongoing exploration of the meaning and value of freedom.

Bowlaway

Elizabeth McCracken

$16.99 $15.63

Bowlaway revolves around the eccentric Bertha Truitt and the New England bowling alley she owns. It’s a Dickensian saga spanning the 20th century, it’s full of whimsy (Bertha opens the bowling alley after being found unconscious in a cemetery with nothing on her but a bowling ball, a candlepin, and 15 pounds of gold), and it’s a heartfelt portrait of human relationships and entanglements.

The Water Cure

Sophie Mackintosh

$16.00 $14.72

Sisters Grace, Sky, and Lia have grown up isolated on remote land, living under the severe rule of their mother and father — the latter called King. King has taught his daughters that men are toxic and dangerous, and that their isolation is necessary for their survival. But months after King’s mysterious death, a violent storm washes three strange men ashore — the first men other than King that they’ve ever met — and the women must figure out how to survive.

Sugar Run (General)

Mesha Maren

$15.95 $14.67

When 35-year-old Jodi McCarty is released after 18 years in prison, she sets off to find someone from her past — someone she promised she’d rescue a long time ago. Along the way, she meets and falls in love with a single mother who’s running from her own demons, kids in tow. Together the mismatched group head toward the abandoned West Virginia farm that once belonged to Jodi’s grandmother, hoping maybe they can turn it into a home.

My Sister, the Serial Killer

Oyinkan Braithwaite

$14.95 $13.75

Oyinkan Braithwaite’s debut novel is about a nurse who has found herself in a dangerous pattern of abetting her younger sister who can’t seem to stop killing men, and it’s a quick read. You can’t help flying through the pages, drawn in by the energy simmering right under the surface of the story, waiting for it to burst. But Braithwaite manages, too, to juxtapose this high-stakes story with the mundanity of daily life and its universal disappointments — the secret fantasies of a workplace crush, the pride in and resentment of carrying too many responsibilities, and the bitter pain of watching someone you love captivate everyone she meets when all you want is to be noticed and appreciated by just one person.

The Friend

Sigrid Nunez

$16.00 $14.72

When a writer loses her best friend and mentor to suicide, her shock is augmented by the fact that he’s left her Apollo, his great Dane. Though she’s at first reluctant — she’s not really a dog person, and her building doesn’t even allow dogs — the two end up forming an unlikely bond in their shared grief, and falling into their own kind of love. It is as much an exploration of human–animal relationships as it is about mentor–student relationships, and Sigrid Nunez’s keen emotional fluency allows the reader to feel a sense of healing and catharsis alongside her protagonist.

Family Trust

Kathy Wang

$16.99 $15.63

When Stanley Huang discovers he's dying of pancreatic cancer, and his family — wife, ex-wife, children, and grandchildren — come together to prepare, two questions linger among them: Is he really as rich as he's always boasted? And how much of that wealth will be mine? It's a story of trust in both senses of the word, and Wang guides us effortlessly through that intertwining mess of love and resentment that only family can create. She does so against the backdrop of Silicon Valley wealth and pretensions, perfectly skewering its (and our) culture of excess.