You Are Here: Art After the Internet

Sam Ashby (Text by (Art/Photo Books)) Omar Kholeif (Editor)
& 1 more
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Description

You Are Here: Art After the Internet is the first major publication to critically explore both the effects and affects that the internet has had on contemporary artistic practices. Responding to an era that has increasingly chosen to dub itself as "post-internet," this collective text explores the relationship of the internet to art practices from the early millennium to the present day. The book positions itself as a provocation on the current state of cultural production, relying on first-person accounts from artists, writers and curators as the primary source material. The book raises urgent questions about how we negotiate the formal, aesthetic and conceptual relationship of art and its effects after the ubiquitous rise of the internet.

"You Are Here is the best anything I've read in ages ... and I'm jealous I'm not a contributor. I really loved it. It's a joy to see new green shoots of cultural tendencies emerging from barren soil." - Douglas Coupland

Product Details

Price
$25.00  $23.00
Publisher
Home and Space
Publish Date
February 27, 2018
Pages
272
Dimensions
6.6 X 0.8 X 9.1 inches | 1.2 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9780956957177
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

Omar Kholeif has quickly become one of the most recognizable curators of modern and contemporary art working globally. By the age of thirty he had curated over a hundred exhibitions and commissions of contemporary artists' work. He has also authored or edited over twenty books on art.
Ed Halter is a founder and director of Light Industry, a venue for film and electronic art in Brooklyn, and teaches in the Film and Electronic Arts Department at Bard College. He has curated screenings and exhibitions at such venues as MoMA P.S.1, the Tate Modern, and the 2012 Whitney Biennial.

Reviews

a current snapshot of how the rise of networked culture in the last decade is affecting the way art is made.... intelligent and accessible responses to the main debates - from differing interpretations of what 'post-Internet' actually means to the contradictions inherent within the corporate ownership of the social media platforms we like to perceive of as 'public' space.--Helen Sumpter "ArtReview "