Wild Berries of Washington and Oregon

Available

Description

Juicy, sweet, tart and sometimes sour, wild berries burst with flavor and goodness. They are a delicious treat any time--especially while you are out hiking--and they could save you from starvation if you get lost. Berries have been used for food and medicine for millennia, and early peoples and settlers preserved them for winter use in everything from pemmican to jams and jellies. In this guide to the wild berries of Washington and Oregon, co-authors T. Abe Lloyd and Fiona Hamersley Chambers provide: - detailed descriptions of over 200 berries and berry-like fruits - ethnobotanical and early Native American uses and management of wild berry resources - range and seasons - edibility of each berry, from highly edible to not palatable to poisonous - descriptions of poisonous wild fruits and berries, so you know which ones to avoid - 20 tasty berry recipes including muffins, squares, popsicles and drinks - full-color photos and beautiful illustrations to help identify the species. You may have forgotten what a "real" berry tastes like, but take this book with you on your next hike and you'll be able to enjoy a cornucopia of freshness.

Product Details

Price
$21.95  $20.19
Publisher
Lone Pine International
Publish Date
May 01, 2014
Pages
256
Dimensions
5.4 X 0.6 X 8.4 inches | 0.97 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9789766500573
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

T. Abe Lloyd is an ethnobotanist and founding director of Salal, the Cascadian Food Institute (www.cascadianfood.net), where he consults with regional Native American Tribal organizations to study and promote indigenous foods. A sixth-generation resident of the Pacific Northwest, Abe was enchanted by nature's edible bounty at a young age. He has a Bachelor of Science in Natural Resource Management (2002) and a Masters of Science degree in Ethnobotany from the University of Victoria (2011). He teaches natural history and ethnobotany courses at Western Washington University and Whatcom Community College, and hands-on foraging courses at Royal Roads University. Abe is vice-president of the Koma Kulshan Chapter of the Washington Native Plant Society, an active member of the Northwest Mushroomers' Association, and a former board Member of the Society of Ethnobiology. He is an avid forager and collects more than half of all he eats. Fiona Hamersley Chambers was born in Vancouver and holds a Masters of Science degree in Environmental Change and Management from Oxford University. She has taught Environmental Studies at the University of Victoria since 1999 and ethnobotany at Pacific Rim College since 2009. Fiona currently divides her time between teaching, writing, and running a small organic farm.

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