Why Walls Won't Work: Repairing the US-Mexico Divide

Available

Product Details

Price
$40.74
Publisher
Oxford University Press, USA
Publish Date
Pages
270
Dimensions
6.48 X 0.93 X 9.39 inches | 1.12 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9780199897988

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About the Author

Michael Dear is Professor of City and Regional Planning in the College of Environmental Design at the University of California-Berkeley. The author/editor of more than a dozen books, he has been a Guggenheim Fellowship holder, a Fellow at the Center for Advanced Study in the Behavioral Sciences atStanford, and Fellow at the Rockefeller Center in Bellagio, Italy. He has received the highest honors for creativity in research from the Association of American Geographers, and numerous undergraduate teaching and graduate mentorship awards.

Reviews


"At a time when so many fears and insecurities are projected onto the border, a book that talks about the realities of this area is a welcome addition. Berkeley geographer Michael Dear provides an accessible and informed overview of the border region. This excellent introduction to the borderlands should be obligatory reading for policymakers and new border scholars." -AAG Review of Books


"A very agreeable text, accessible to non-academic readers, which-together with the author's elegant and poetic style-at times creates the impression of reading a novel." -Documenta d'Analisi Geografica


"With the broad historical sweep and the patience to tell those earlier stories first without rushing ahead to our walled and bordered present, this book could become the definitive history of the U.S.-Mexico border. It is certainly the best I have read." -Geographical Review


"Those interested in one way that the discipline of border studies has developed to account for the post 9/11 context will find this book interesting and instructive; Dear's focus on the physicality of the border Wall itself is most convincing." -The London School of Economics and Political Science Review of Books