Who Let the Dogs In?: Incredible Political Animals I Have Known

Molly Ivins (Author)
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Product Details

Price
$14.95
Publisher
Random House Trade
Publish Date
July 12, 2005
Pages
384
Dimensions
5.34 X 0.85 X 7.96 inches | 0.6 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9780812973075
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

MOLLY IVINS began her career in journalism as the complaint department of the Houston Chronicle. In 1970, she became co-editor of The Texas Observer, which afforded her frequent fits of hysterical laughter while covering Texas legislature. In 1976, Ivins joined The New York Times as a political reporter. The next year, she was named Rocky Mountain Bureau Chief, chiefly because there was no one else in the bureau. In 1982, she returned once more to Texas, which may indicate a masochistic streak, and has had plenty to write about ever since. Her column is syndicated in more than three hundred newspapers, and her freelance work has appeared in Esquire, The Atlantic Monthly, The New York Times Magazine, The Nation, and Harper's, and other publications. Her first book, Molly Ivins Can't Say That, Can She?, spent more than a year on the New York Times bestseller list. Her books with Lou Dubose on George W. Bush, Shrub and Bushwhacked, were national bestsellers. A three-time Pulitzer Prize finalist, she counts as her two greatest honors that the Minneapolis police force named its mascot pig after her and that she was once banned from the campus of Texas A&M.

Reviews

Praise for Bushwhacked

"Dubose and the razor-tongued Ivins have done their homework, offering a well-researched, comprehensive examination of the dark side of the Bush administration's agenda, served up with enough saucy language and humor to make it an entertaining read."
-Rocky Mountain News

"Bushwhacked is primarily an indictment of a radical Republican regime. But it is also a celebration of average citizens and 'nameless, shirt-sleeve, not-very-well-paid functionaries' who have taken it upon themselves to blow whistles . . ., file lawsuits . . ., and otherwise fight back."
-Mother Jones

"Striking . . . Just as the Gilded Age brought forth a golden age of muckraking, our modern descent into money politics has brought forth a new wave of outraged reporters. Ivins and Dubose are worthy heirs of an honorable tradition."
-The New York Review of Books