Who Ate the First Oyster?: The Extraordinary People Behind the Greatest Firsts in History

Cody Cassidy (Author)
Available

Product Details

Price
$17.00  $15.64
Publisher
Penguin Books
Publish Date
May 05, 2020
Pages
240
Dimensions
5.4 X 8.2 X 0.7 inches | 0.55 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9780143132752

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About the Author

Cody Cassidy is the co-author of the popular science book And Then You're Dead, which was translated into more than ten languages, and a former bookstore clerk in Buenos Aires. While writing Who Ate the First Oyster? he attempted to shave with chipped obsidian like the inventor of the world's first razor, retraced the final steps of an ancient murder victim through the Pyrenees and the Alps, brewed beer by spoiling gruel, and fired a replica of an ancient bow and arrow, among other experiments. He lives in San Francisco.

Reviews

Praise for Who Ate the First Oyster?

"A fun and enlightening quick trip through all the clever, stupid, dangerous, and gross human firsts that we've all wondered about."
--Zach and Kelly Weinersmith, New York Times bestselling authors of Soonish: Ten Emerging Technologies That'll Improve and/or Ruin Everything

"In this fascinating and entertaining book, Cody Cassidy has done what might seem impossible: illustrating the identity, life, and death of some of the most momentous--and entirely anonymous--figures in human (and prehuman) history."
--Ryan North, author of How To Invent Everything: A Survival Guide for the Stranded Time Traveler

"Illuminating and entertaining . . . Cassidy humanizes prehistory with wit and a firm grasp of the science behind these anthropological case studies. Enthralled readers will develop a new appreciation for the ancient past."
--Publishers Weekly

"Cassidy embarks on a wide-ranging, far-flung journey of curiosity that easily engages the reader. Chapters are brimming with history that may surprise readers as well as compel them to further investigate."
--Booklist

"A breezy read through millennia of human development."
--Kirkus Reviews