What Saves Us: Poems of Empathy and Outrage in the Age of Trump

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Product Details

Price
$24.95  $22.95
Publisher
Northwestern University Press
Publish Date
Pages
288
Dimensions
6.0 X 8.9 X 0.9 inches | 0.95 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9780810140776
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About the Author

MARTÍN ESPADA has published almost twenty books as a poet, editor, essayist, and translator. His latest collection of poems is called Vivas to Those Who Have Failed. He is the recipient of the 2018 Ruth Lilly Prize, and the editor of the groundbreaking anthology Poetry Like Bread: Poets of the Political Imagination from Curbstone Press.

Reviews

"Far more than a protest anthology, Martin Espada's What Saves Us brings together portraits of Trump's enablers with the myriad voices of the lost, abandoned, and marginalized. These stories of immigrants, minimum wage workers, alcoholics, victims, broken angels, and dreamers redeem their lives and install their voices in our hearts."

--Cary Nelson, author of Revolutionary Memory: Recovering the Poetry of the American Left
"Poet Martín Espada has put together a potent, moving anthology of poetry . . ." --Nina MacLaughlin, The Boston Globe

"In the poem by Bruce Weigl that gives the collection its title, 'What Saves Us, ' he writes that 'We are not always right about what we think will save us.' But the heart of this anthology is that it is clearly telling us what will not save us: our silence. Jane Hirshfield asks in her poem, 'Let Them Not Say, ' that difficult question that has been heard more and more in the past four years and will be asked by generations that come after us: When it was happening, what did you do about it?" --Kenneth Ronkowitz, Paterson Literary Review
"Direct, colloquial and unironic, these poems speak from and for the communities that reflect the unstoppable diversification of US society, by asserting a common humanity in the face of dehumanization." --Andy Croft, Morning Star