What It Means to Be Human: The Case for the Body in Public Bioethics

O. Carter Snead (Author)
Available

Product Details

Price
$47.94
Publisher
Harvard University Press
Publish Date
October 13, 2020
Pages
336
Dimensions
5.8 X 8.1 X 1.3 inches | 1.05 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9780674987722

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About the Author

O. Carter Snead is William P. and Hazel B. White Director of the de Nicola Center for Ethics and Culture, Professor of Law, and Concurrent Professor of Political Science at the University of Notre Dame. He is a member of the Pontifical Academy for Life, the principal bioethics advisory body to Pope Francis, and a Fellow of the Hastings Center.

Reviews

What It Means to Be Human belongs on the desk of anyone concerned about the challenges ahead in the field of public bioethics. After taking a hard look at the flawed assumptions that shape most of today's thinking, Snead outlines an approach firmly grounded in the complexity of human experience.--Mary Ann Glendon, author of The Forum and the Tower
This remarkable and insightful account of contemporary public bioethics and its individualist assumptions is indispensable reading for anyone with bioethical concerns. Whether you agree or disagree with Snead's perspective, all will be in his debt for this critical work.--Alasdair MacIntyre, author of After Virtue
O. Carter Snead has written a brilliantly insightful book about how American law has enshrined individual autonomy as the highest moral good. He suggests an alternative foundation for contemporary bioethics, based on an understanding of human beings as social creatures, embedded in mutually dependent physical bodies. Highly thought-provoking.--Francis Fukuyama, author of Identity: The Demand for Dignity and the Politics of Resentment
Public bioethics has for too long labored under the illusion that its purpose is to maximize individual choice. Snead shows how this results in policies that are hostile to human beings as they actually are: essentially embodied, ever dependent on others, flourishing only when loving and being loved. This is required reading.--Farr Curlin, Trent Center for Bioethics, Duke University
Faulty anthropology makes for faulty law, especially when the subject is human life itself. Through a meticulous analysis of American legal cases touching the beginnings and ends of life, O. Carter Snead demonstrates how our entire approach to bioethical matters ironically ignores the lived reality and value of human embodiment, pointing the way to a richer approach that will promote social solidarity. A most significant achievement!--Leon R. Kass, Chairman, President's Council on Bioethics (2002-2005)