"What Does Injustice Have to Do with Me?": Engaging Privileged White Students with Social Justice

David Nurenberg (Author)
Available

Description

Why should we care about the education of privileged white students? Conversations about education in America focus near-exclusively on underprivileged, majority-minority schools for many important reasons. What Does Injustice Have to Do With Me?, however, argues that such efforts cannot succeed in creating a more just and equitable society without also addressing the students who benefit from America's educational, economic and racial inequities. These young people grow up to wield disproportionate power and influence, yet emerge undereducated and poorly prepared to navigate, let alone shape, our increasingly diverse country. David Nurenberg weaves together narrative from his twenty years of suburban teaching with relevant research in education and critical race theory to provide practical, hands-on strategies for educators dealing with challenges unique to high-powered suburban, urban and independent schools: affluent myopia, white fragility, the empathy gap, overinvolved parents, overcautious administrators and an "if it isn't broke, don't fix it" mentality. Despite high test scores and college acceptances, many schools serving affluent white students are indeed broken. Social justice education for privileged white students is not only critical for our society, but also for helping those students themselves emerge from a culture of anxiety and cynicism to find meaning, purpose and self-confidence as activist allies.

Product Details

Price
$43.20
Publisher
Rowman & Littlefield Publishers
Publish Date
May 29, 2020
Pages
234
Dimensions
5.98 X 0.53 X 9.02 inches | 0.77 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781475853742

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About the Author

David Nurenberg, Ph.D. is an associate professor, educational consultant, and writer in the Boston area who has taught courses at the high school, undergraduate, and graduate level for over 20 years. His writing has appeared in Education Week, The Harvard Educational Review, NCTE's English Education, High School Journal, and elsewhere. He is the host of the podcast Ed Infinitium.