We Trade Our Night for Someone Else's Day

Available

Product Details

Price
$18.95  $17.43
Publisher
Seven Stories Press
Publish Date
Pages
240
Dimensions
5.5 X 8.3 X 0.6 inches | 0.6 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781644210482

Earn by promoting books

Earn money by sharing your favorite books through our Affiliate program.

Become an affiliate

About the Author

Ivana Bodrozic was born in Vukovar, Croatia, in 1982, where she lived until the Yugoslav Wars started in 1991. That year her father disappeared while fighting for Croatian independence and she and the rest of her family moved to a refugee hotel in Kumrovec. In 2005, she published her first poetry collection, The First Step into Darkness, and in 2010 her acclaimed and bestselling first novel The Hotel Tito, which won three major awards in Croatia and the Prix Ulysse for Best Debut Novel in France. It was published by Seven Stories in 2017. Since then Bodrozic released her second poetry collection, A Crossing for Wild Animals, and a short story collection, 100% Cotton. We Trade Our Night for Someone Else's Day is her second novel and her first political thriller. Ellen Elias-Bursac translates fiction and nonfiction from Bosnian, Croatian, and Serbian. She has taught in the Harvard University Slavic Department and is a contributing editor to Asymptote. Her most recent translation for Seven Stories is Robert Perisic's novel No-Signal Area. She lives in Boston.

Reviews

"In We Trade Our Night for Someone Else's Day, Ivana Bodrozic takes our most taboo subjects and puts them in a familiar setting, to damning effect." --Drago Hedl, multi-award-winning Croatian journalist and crime fiction author

In an unnamed Croatian city in 2010, reporter Nora Kirin, the heroine of this searing political thriller from Bodrozic (The Hotel Tito), hopes to expose the city's sleazy government. Instead, she's assigned to write a lurid piece about a Croatian high school teacher who murdered her brutal husband, a Croatian war veteran, while having an affair with a student, an ethnic Serb. Nora's own troubled past distracts her from this task. Her father disappeared in 1991, just before a horrifying massacre of Croats by Serbs. As Nora seeks the truth about his fate, she uncovers heinous instances of immorality throughout a city supposedly promoting "peaceful reintegration" between Croats and Serbs. In her effort to get justice for her father, Nora dooms her own love affair. Bodrozic smoothly integrates Nora's gripping personal story with, as revealed in a translator's note, the recent history of Vukovar, the author's native city. Noir fans won't want to miss this one. --Publishers Weekly, starred review