We

Available

Product Details

Price
$8.99  $8.27
Publisher
Harper Voyager
Publish Date
Pages
256
Dimensions
4.2 X 6.7 X 0.8 inches | 0.25 pounds
Language
English
Type
Mass Market Paperbound
EAN/UPC
9780380633135

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About the Author

Yevgeny Zamyatin was born in Russia in 1884. Arrested during the abortive 1905 revolution, he was exiled twice from St. Petersburg, then given amnesty in 1913. We, composed in 1920 and 1921, elicited attacks from party-line critics and writers. In 1929, the Russian Association of Proletarian Writers launched an all-out attack against him. Denied the right to publish his work, he requested permission to leave Russia, which Stalin granted in 1931. Zamyatin went to Paris, where he died in 1937.

Mirra Ginsburg is a distinguished translator of Russian and Yiddish works by such well-known authors as Mikhail Bulgakov, Isaac Babel, Isaac Bashevis Singer, and Fyodor Dostoevsky. Editor and translator of three anthologies of Soviet science fiction, she has also edited and translated A Soviet Heretic: Essays by Yevgeny Zamyatin, and History of Soviet Literature by Vera Alexandrova.

Mirra Ginsburg (1909-2000) was born in Russia. In addition to The Master and Margarita, she translated other works by Bulgakov, as well as works by Zamyatin, Dostoyevsky, Babel, Zoshchenko, Platonov, and others. She edited many books, including The Fatal Eggs and Other Soviet Satire, and wrote more than twenty books for children.

Reviews

"As the first major anti-utopian fantasy ... has its own peculiar wryness and grace, sharper than the pamphleteering of 1984 or the philosophical schema of Brave New World, its celebrated descendants". -- Kirkus Reviews
""We" is one of the great novels of the twentieth century."-- Irving Howe"One of the best!"-- "New York Review of Books""As the first major anti-utopian fantasy . . . "We has its own peculiar wryness and grace, sharper than the pamphleteering of "1984" or thephilosophical scheme of "Brave New World, " its celebrated descendants."-- "Kirkus Reviews""Fantastic."-- "The New York Times"