War, So Much War

(Author) (Translator)
& 1 more
Available

Product Details

Price
$13.95  $12.83
Publisher
Open Letter
Publish Date
Pages
220
Dimensions
5.4 X 8.4 X 0.6 inches | 0.6 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781940953229

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About the Author

Mercè Rodoreda is widely regarded as the most important Catalan writer of the twentieth century. Exiled to France during the Spanish Civil War, and only able to return to Catalonia in the mid-1960s, she wrote a number of highly praised works, including The Time of the Doves and Death in Spring.

Maruxa Relaño is a journalist and translator based in Barcelona. She has worked as a translator for The Wall Street Journal, a writer for NY1, and wrote articles for the New York Daily News, Newsday, and New York magazine, among other publications.

Martha Tennent was born in the U.S, but has lived most of her life in Barcelona where she served as founding dean of the School of Translation and Interpreting at the University of Vic. She translates from Spanish and Catalan, and received an NEA Translation Fellowship for her work on Rodoreda.

Reviews

"Mercè Rodoreda has been a favorite of mine ever since college. . . . War, So Much War helps to expand our understanding of a world-class writer's fiction, with, hopefully more to come."--Jeff VanderMeer, author of The Southern Reach Trilogy

"Episodic in style, [Rodoreda's] language is breathtaking and transportive, ultimately showing the reader the universal beauty and injustice of fate. . . . An incredibly original work and not to be missed."--Mark Haber, Brazos Bookstore

"Rodoreda's clear, clean prose, rendered so capably into English by Relaño and Tennent, creates a mood of desperation that will engage the contemplative reader . . ."--Library Journal

"Mercè Rodoreda's War, So Much War is a gripping story, passing as the account of the wanderings of a highly sensitive young man. . . . Rodoreda is not afraid to probe man's humanity in the face of ubiquitous warfare that ought to destroy mankind or--at the least--send it back to the Dark Ages."--CounterPunch