War of Numbers: An Intelligence Memoir of the Vietnam War's Uncounted Enemy

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Product Details

Price
$19.95
Publisher
Truth to Power
Publish Date
Pages
304
Dimensions
5.4 X 8.4 X 1.0 inches | 0.75 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781586422516

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About the Author

Sam Adams was a graduate of Harvard College and spent ten years as an analyst for the CIA. He was completing this memoir when he died of a heart attack in 1988.

Col. David Hackworth was the author of About Face and the youngest full Colonel in the US Army when he resigned in protest over the Vietnam War.

Dr. John Prados is a senior research fellow at the National Security Archive, where he also directs the Archive's Iraq Documentation Project and its Vietnam Project. His books Vietnam: The History of an Unwinnable War, 1945-1975, Keepers of the Keys and Combined Fleet Decoded were each nominated for the Pulitzer Prize.

Reviews

"More than a rehash of yesteryear's bureaucratic battles, and more even than delicious inside gossip, Adams paints a fascinating and personalized picture of the backroom, political wartime CIA." - Library Journal

"A stunning account by a man of impeccable integrity, of the corruption of U.S. military intelligence in Vietnam." - Mike Wallace

"If someone were to ask me what three books they should read to understand what happened in Vietnam, I would say: Street Without Joy, by Bernard Fall; Honorable Men, by William Colby; and War of Numbers by Sam Adams. . . . There are probaboly 5,000 books on Vietnam. War of Numbers will become a classic." -- Lt. Col. H. Thomas Hayden, The Marine Corps Gazette

"As spellbinding as a mystery story -- which of course it is." -- The Boston Globe

One of "the most important books of the Vietnam War -- Adams has had the last word, in permanent defiance of those who would re-write the war to doublethink specifications." -- The Chicago Tribune