Unsustainable Inequalities: Social Justice and the Environment

Lucas Chancel (Author) Malcolm Debevoise (Translator)
Available

Product Details

Price
$29.95
Publisher
Belknap Press
Publish Date
October 06, 2020
Pages
184
Dimensions
5.8 X 8.3 X 0.9 inches | 0.75 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9780674984653

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About the Author

Lucas Chancel is codirector of the World Inequality Lab at the Paris School of Economics and coeditor of the World Inequality Report 2018. A lecturer at Sciences Po, he is also Senior Research Fellow at the Institute for Sustainable Development and International Relations.

Reviews

Rising inequality and global warming are the most pressing issues of our time. Written by one of world's leading experts on global inequality trends and sustainable development, this book demonstrates that they can and should be addressed together, and offers refreshing perspectives on how to do so. A must-read.--Thomas Piketty, author of Capital and Ideology
In this concise and precise book Chancel offers an indispensable metric to reveal the class conflicts that cut across the simplistic divide between ecology and social justice, reconciling those afraid of the 'end of the world' and those trying to 'make ends meet.'--Bruno Latour, author of Facing Gaia
Lucas Chancel reflects on the complex articulation of the environmental and the socioeconomic spheres... [The book] opens up avenues toward a more desirable and livable future.--Le Monde
[Chancel] relentlessly sheds light on the failure of liberal policies.--Politis
Well-structured, fluent, and sharp, Unsustainable Inequalities is a work of global relevance and paramount importance, even more so as inequalities as we have them make it impossible to confront the worsening climate crisis.--Claude Henry, Sciences Po, Paris
Sobering but essential...[Chancel] identifies social inequality as a core driver of environmental unsustainability that leads to a vicious circle wherein the rich consume more and the poor lose access to environmental resources and become increasingly vulnerable to environmental shocks.--Gillian Bowser"Science" (09/08/2020)