Unspeakable

Available

Product Details

Price
$16.99  $15.63
Publisher
Hot Books
Publish Date
Pages
160
Dimensions
6.0 X 8.9 X 0.6 inches | 0.4 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781510729421

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About the Author

Chris Hedges is the New York Times bestselling author of Days of Destruction, Days of Revolt and War Is a Force That Gives Us Meaning, a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award, and is a former New York Times foreign correspondent who was part of a team awarded the Pulitzer Prize in 2002 for coverage of the War on Terror. He lives in Princeton, New Jersey, with his family.

David Talbot is the New York Times bestselling author of Brothers: The Hidden History of the Kennedy Years and The Devil's Chessboard. He is the founder and former editor-in-chief of Salon and has written for the New Yorker, Rolling Stone, and Time. He lives in San Francisco, California.

Reviews

"A long-running commentary on the many issues Hedges confronts in his writing, including war, Occupy Wall Street, and the New York Times' relationship to organs of state power . . . It's bracing to hear Hedges's unfiltered dissent and disdain, from his dismissal of George W. Bush as 'a man of limited intelligence and dubious morals' to his discussion of how the seductions of celebrity undermined Christopher Hitchens's writing." ?Publishers Weekly

"[Hedges] insights and opinions?which have been hard-earned over a tumultuous career of covering war and revolution, suffering and liberation?should be part of our national debate." ?David Talbot

"Chris Hedges fearlessly tells his own 'forbidden' stories. . . . The Pulitzer Prize?winning journalist tells how he saw firsthand 'how the elites and the children of the elites treated those 'beneath them.'" ?Alternet

"Like early twentieth-century muckraking journalists and, more recently, I.F. Stone, Hedges makes a boisterous outspoken contribution to revolutionizing the national conversation." ?Kirkus Reviews