Turn Here Sweet Corn: Organic Farming Works

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Product Details

Price
$24.95
Publisher
University of Minnesota Press
Publish Date
Pages
344
Dimensions
6.2 X 9.0 X 1.4 inches | 0.01 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9780816677719

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About the Author

Atina Diffley is an organic vegetable farmer who now educates consumers, farmers, and policymakers about organic farming through the consulting business Organic Farming Works LLC, owned by her and her husband, Martin. From 1973 through 2007, the Diffleys owned and operated Gardens of Eagan, one of the first certified organic produce farms in the Midwest.

Reviews

"Turn Here Sweet Corn is an unexpected page-turner. Atina Diffley's compelling account of her life as a Minnesota organic farmer is deeply moving not only from a personal standpoint but also from the political. Diffley reveals the evident difficulties of small-scale organic farming but is inspirational about its value to people and the planet." --Marion Nestle, author of What to Eat


"This book is wonderful on so many levels: the swift moving and dramatic story of Atina and Martin Diffley, the farmers of Gardens of Eagan, as they confront wild weather, development pressure, and pipelines. The transformation of Tina into Atina, from confused teenager to strong, passionate, and committed leader in organic agriculture. A powerful argument for organic farming and a must read for anyone thinking of farming--a vivid and realistic picture of the beauties, satisfactions, and stresses of farming as a way of life. And finally, a vision of hope for the future: blending intuitive faith in our oneness with Nature, the most advanced biological science, and the power of community." --Elizabeth Henderson, author of Sharing The Harvest: A Citizen's Guide to Community Supported Agriculture


"What strikes me most about this amazing memoir is that for those of us who aren't farmers but who are versant in such issues as organics, soil building, diversity, GMOs, certification and more--it is utterly different to hear how the farmer herself grapples with them in her daily life. Unlike reading about the same issues in an article, it's immediate, powerful, tender, heartbreaking and above all, encouraging." --Deborah Madison, author of Local Flavors, Cooking and Eating from America's Farmers Markets

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