True Stories, Well Told: From the First 20 Years of Creative Nonfiction Magazine

Hattie Fletcher (Editor) Lee Gutkind (Editor)
& 1 more
Available

Product Details

Price
$15.95  $14.67
Publisher
In Fact Books
Publish Date
August 26, 2014
Pages
342
Dimensions
5.4 X 1.0 X 8.4 inches | 0.65 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781937163167
BISAC Categories:

Earn by promoting books

Earn money by sharing your favorite books through our Affiliate program.

Become an affiliate

About the Author

Lee Gutkind has been exploring the world of medicine through writing for over 20 years. He is the author of Many Sleepless Nights: The World of Organ Transplantation, and the editor of four anthologies about health and medicine: Silence Kills: Speaking Out and Saving Lives; Rage and Reconciliation: Inspiring a Health Care Revolution; Healing; and Becoming a Doctor.

Gutkind is the founder and editor of the magazine Creative Nonfiction, the first and largest literary journal to exclusively publish nonfiction, and has also published the essay collection Forever Fat and two books on writing, The Art of Creative Nonfiction and Keep It Real, among other titles. Currently he teaches creative writing at Arizona State University's Consortium for Science, Policy, and Outcomes.

Based in Pittsburgh, Hattie Fletcher has been the managing editor of Creative Nonfiction since 2004.

Susan Orlean is the author of The Orchid Thief and Rin Tin Tin and is a staff writer at The New Yorker. She lives in New York City.

Reviews


From the "Kirkus" review

"An engaging anthology of creative nonfiction from the editors at "Creative Nonfiction" magazine.

"The magazine is now celebrating its 20th birthday, so when founding editor Gutkind . . . and managing editor Fletcher went to pick a handful of wildflowers from this bounty to fashion this collection, they had plenty to choose from. Many of the pieces have an experimental quality in that they catch something elemental from an unexplored angle as they venture onto shaky ground. The spiciest take no pains to disguise the process of getting there: Readers share the sensory information coming in and witness the writer's brain decoding and shaping the material, all subjective and unlike any other, making their own local color as both participant and observer and changing their way of being in the world. As a style, creative nonfiction has yet to be thoroughly pinned down; it remains simultaneously furtive and dodgy, versatile and as inclusive as a hug from Walt Whitman. Longtime New Yorker contributor Susan Orlean--who better to write the introduction?--makes important suggestions to writers considering creative nonfiction: "Don't over-prepare. Be willing to jump into stories naked; you'll listen harder and learn more authentically. On the other hand, do over-report. Follow bits of the story that aren't quite on topic; you'll probably find something unexpected and fascinating." Other contributors include Sonya Huber, Gordon Lish, Toi Derricotte and Louise DeSalvo. In Vanity Fair, James Wolcott declared that creative nonfiction is "a sickly transfusion, whereby the weakling personal voice of sensitive fiction is inserted into the beery carcass of nonfiction." This anthology proves otherwise.

"Whether inducing tears or raucous laughter, all the pieces are inviting, inquisitive and attentive--and sure to spark plenty of imaginations."

From the Kirkus review

"An engaging anthology of creative nonfiction from the editors at Creative Nonfiction magazine.

"The magazine is now celebrating its 20th birthday, so when founding editor Gutkind . . . and managing editor Fletcher went to pick a handful of wildflowers from this bounty to fashion this collection, they had plenty to choose from. Many of the pieces have an experimental quality in that they catch something elemental from an unexplored angle as they venture onto shaky ground. The spiciest take no pains to disguise the process of getting there: Readers share the sensory information coming in and witness the writer's brain decoding and shaping the material, all subjective and unlike any other, making their own local color as both participant and observer and changing their way of being in the world. As a style, creative nonfiction has yet to be thoroughly pinned down; it remains simultaneously furtive and dodgy, versatile and as inclusive as a hug from Walt Whitman. Longtime New Yorker contributor Susan Orlean--who better to write the introduction?--makes important suggestions to writers considering creative nonfiction: "Don't over-prepare. Be willing to jump into stories naked; you'll listen harder and learn more authentically. On the other hand, do over-report. Follow bits of the story that aren't quite on topic; you'll probably find something unexpected and fascinating." Other contributors include Sonya Huber, Gordon Lish, Toi Derricotte and Louise DeSalvo. In Vanity Fair, James Wolcott declared that creative nonfiction is "a sickly transfusion, whereby the weakling personal voice of sensitive fiction is inserted into the beery carcass of nonfiction." This anthology proves otherwise.

"Whether inducing tears or raucous laughter, all the pieces are inviting, inquisitive and attentive--and sure to spark plenty of imaginations."