Trespass: Ecotone Essayists Beyond the Boundaries Ofplace, Identity, and Feminism

Belle Boggs (Contribution by) Camille T. Dungy (Contribution by)
& 5 more
Available

Product Details

Price
$18.95  $17.43
Publisher
Lookout Books
Publish Date
April 30, 2019
Pages
296
Dimensions
5.5 X 0.8 X 8.5 inches | 0.75 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781940596297
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

Belle Boggs is the author of The Art of Waiting: On Fertility, Medicine, and Motherhood, a finalist for the PENโ€Š/โ€ŠDiamonstein-Spielvogel Award for the Art of the Essay, and Mattaponi Queen, which won the Bakeless Prize and the Library of Virginia Literary Award. She teaches in the MFA program at North Carolina State University.
Camille T. Dungy is the author of Suck on the Marrow (Red Hen Press, 2010), winner of the American Book Award and a Silver Medalist for the California Book Award; and What to Eat, What to Drink, What to Leave for Poison (Red Hen Press, 2006), a finalist for the PEN Center USA 2007 Literary Award and the Library of Virginia 2007 Literary Award. Dungy has received fellowships from organizations including the National Endowment for the Arts, The Virginia Commission for the Arts, Cave Canem, Bread Loaf, the Dana Award, and the American Antiquarian Society. Dungy is Associate Professor in the Creative Writing Department at San Francisco State University. Editor of Black Nature: A Poetry Anthology (University of Georgia Press, 2009), she is co-editor of From the Fishouse: An Anthology of Poems that Sing, Rhyme, Resound, Syncopate, Alliterate, and Just Plain Sound Great (Persea Books, 2009) and assistant editor of Gathering Ground: A Reader Celebrating Cave Canem's First Decade (University of Michigan Press, 2006). Her poems have been published widely in anthologies and print and online journals. ๏ปฟ
Aimee Nezhukumatathil is the author of four collections of poems, including, most recently, Oceanic, winner of the Mississippi Institute of Arts and Letters Award. Other awards for her writing include fellowships and grants from the Guggenheim Foundation, the National Endowment for the Arts, Mississippi Arts Council, and MacDowell. Her writing appears in Poetry, the New York Times Magazine, ESPN, and Tin House. She serves as poetry faculty for the Writing Workshops in Greece and is professor of English and creative writing in the University of Mississippi's MFA program.
Tracing memory threads Lauret Edith Savoy's life and work: unearthing what is buried, re-membering what is fragmented, shattered, eroded. A woman of African American, Euro-American, and Native American heritage, she writes about the stories we tell of the American land's origins and the stories we tell of ourselves in this land. Her books include Trace: Memory, History, Race, and the American Landscape; The Colors of Nature: Culture, Identity and the Natural World; Bedrock: Writers on the Wonders of Geology; and Living with the Changing California Coast. Trace won the 2016 American Book Award from the Before Columbus Foundation and the 2017 ASLE Creative Book Award, was a finalist for the 2016 PEN Open Book Award and the Phillis Wheatley Book Award, and was shortlisted for the William Saroyan International Prize for Writing and the Orion Book Award. Lauret is the David B. Truman Professor of Environmental Studies and Geology at Mount Holyoke College, a Fellow of the Geological Society of America, a photo-grapher, and a pilot.
Arisa White is a Cave Canem graduate poet and her work has been nominated for the NAACP Image Awards, California Book Awards, and Wheatley Book Awards. Her recent poetry collection You're the Most Beautiful Thing That Happened was a nominee for the 29th Lambda Literary Awards. As the creator of the Beautiful Things Project, Arisa curates cultural events and artistic collaborations that center narratives of queer and trans people of color. She serves on the board of directors for Nomadic Press and is an assistant professor at Colby College.
Terry Tempest Williams is a crucial voice for raising ecological awareness and has authored numerous books, from the classic Refuge: An Unnatural History of Family and Place (1991) to the more recent The Hour of Land: A Personal Topography of America's National Parks (2016) and Erosion: Essays of Undoing (2019). Her work has been published in the New Yorker, New York Times, Orion Magazine, and anthologies worldwide. Williams is writer-in-residence at the Harvard Divinity School, Cambridge, Massachusetts.
May-lee Chai is the author of ten books of fiction, nonfiction, and translation, including the memoir Hapa Girl and the recent story collection Useful Phrases for Immigrants, which won the Bakwin Award for Writing by a Woman. Her writing has been awarded a National Endowment for the Arts fellowship, a Jack Dyer Fiction Prize, and the Asian / Pacific American Award for Literature; named a Kiriyama Prize Notable Book; and given honorable mention for the Gustavus Myers Center for the Study of Bigotry and Human Rights Book Award.