Trees in Trouble: Wildfires, Infestations, and Climate Change

Available

Product Details

Price
$26.00  $23.92
Publisher
Counterpoint LLC
Publish Date
Pages
304
Dimensions
6.0 X 9.1 X 1.3 inches | 1.3 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9781640091351

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About the Author

DANIEL MATHEWS is the author of Natural History of the Pacific Northwest Mountains, Rocky Mountain Natural History, and Cascade-Olympic Natural History. During a career of writing about the natural history of western North America, he has backpacked far and wide, watched for fires from Desolation Peak Lookout, witnessed a forty-inch-thick fir crash onto his family's house in a storm, and lived for several years in a forest cabin without electricity, heating with firewood and writing by kerosene lamp. He lives in Portland, Oregon.

Reviews

Longlisted for the 2021 AAAS/Subaru SB&F Prize for Excellence in Science Books
Chicago Review of Books, 1 of 10 Must-Read Books for This Month

"Trees in Trouble is a well done & professional piece, with a great sense for the diversity of the conifer country. This dense and graceful book is about what can and should be done. There's no excess, this text simply tells what should be done. Reason enough to do it, and some of these great old trees will live it through. May some of our own children still be with them." --Gary Snyder

"Mathews writes in a chatty style, sharing many thoughtful insights." --Barbara Lloyd McMichael, Coast Weekend

"Trees in Trouble dives into the forces that threaten the forests of the West, from invasive species to climate change, with a focus on major fires . . . It is full of interesting potential solutions to said threats, and there's lots of lovely writing about the region's incredible diversity of trees to help you remember why all this is worth thinking about." --Outside magazine

"Lays out challenges facing today's pine forests that inspire new respect for their strength and resilience--and for the dilemma they're in." --Amy Wang, The Oregonian

"The appeal of Mathews' evaluation of these valuable conifer forests may skew slightly to the more scientifically minded reader, yet his deeply personal connection to the land and its majestic trees makes this equally suitable for any tree lover and everyone concerned about the state of the planet." --Booklist

"A walk in the woods with an environmental journalist and natural-history writer reveals that the forested world is in grave danger . . . His book sounds a timely warning to pay more heed to the health of the woodlands. Thoughtful environmental reportage suggesting that the fate of trees is the fate of all life." --Kirkus Reviews

"Trees in Trouble is crucial reading for anyone who cares about the Mountain West." --John Daniel, author of The Trail Home and Rogue River Journal

"Natural historian Mathews vividly relates the complex environmental situation facing America's western pine forests in this fascinating account . . . Eco-conscious readers, even those unversed in this seemingly niche subject, will be intrigued and enlightened by Mathews's thoughtful work." --Publishers Weekly

"Mathews takes us on a journey through the challenged and treasured forests of the American West, exploring the natural and unnatural forces of fire, destruction, and regrowth. In a careful blend of complex science in welcoming prose and urgent reportage, Trees in Trouble unveils the fraught future of our forests in a warming world and the suite of actions required to chart a different course." --Lauren E. Oakes, author of In Search of the Canary Tree

"After the catastrophic conflagrations of Summer and Fall, 2020, it is not hyperbole to say that I can't think of another book more vital to the American West at this time than Trees in Trouble. Daniel Mathews' deftly written, brilliantly researched and reasoned foray into climate woe and super-fires does everything in its power to set us on the best possible path to steward what's left of our absolutely vital forests." --David James Duncan, author of The Brothers K and the forthcoming Sun House