Three-Card Monte

Marco Malvaldi (Author)
Available

Description

When a Japanese scientist dies in a Tuscan resort town, four old card players and their favorite bartender investigate in this comic Italian mystery.

In the Italian resort town of Pineta, along the Tuscan coast, one might find the sleepy Bar Lume inhabited by its owner Massimo and its elderly regulars engaged in a game of cards. But this is merely a cover for the true activities of this senile squad. In truth, they are at work analyzing, postulating, gossiping, and chronicling every event that occurs in their small Tuscan town, using the most colorful language and Tuscan slang possible. When a chemistry conference at a local hotel is interrupted by the suspicious death of a Japanese scientist, Massimo is obliged to investigate on behalf of his all-too-curious clientele. The old-timers provide running commentary, demonstrating a cunning for sniffing out lies that can only be honed through decades of playing three-card monte.
The second book in Marco Malvaldi's beloved Bar Lume series, Three-Card Monte is a comedy, a beguiling mystery, and a vivacious portrayal of small-town Italy.

Product Details

Price
$16.00  $14.72
Publisher
Europa Editions
Publish Date
August 26, 2014
Pages
168
Dimensions
5.3 X 0.6 X 8.2 inches | 0.5 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781609452056

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About the Author

Marco Malvaldi was born in Pisa in 1974. Three Card Monte is the second in the Bar Lume series, featuring Massimo the Barman and the four elderly sleuths. Malvadi is the winner of both the Isola d'Elba Award and the Castiglioncello Prize for his crime novels.

Reviews

"Readers will see themselves reflected in this portrayal of the provinces, the small towns, those regular haunts that we visit every day--the same bar, the same cafe. Readers recognize themselves, and it's reassuring."--Andrea Camilleri
-Readers will see themselves reflected in this portrayal of the provinces, the small towns, those regular haunts that we visit every day--the same bar, the same cafe. Readers recognize themselves, and it's reassuring.---Andrea Camilleri