The Zohar: Pritzker Edition, Volume Five

(Translator)
Available

Product Details

Price
$60.00  $55.20
Publisher
Stanford University Press
Publish Date
Pages
656
Dimensions
7.3 X 10.28 X 1.84 inches | 3.04 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9780804762199
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

Daniel C. Matt is a leading authority on Jewish mysticism. He served as Professor at the Graduate Theological Union in Berkeley, California and has taught at Stanford University and the Hebrew University of Jerusalem. Matt is the author of The Essential Kabbalah (1996); Zohar: Annotated and Explained (2002); and God and the Big Bang (1996). Matt is also the translator of the first four volumes of The Zohar: Pritzker Edition

Reviews

"Daniel Matt's translation of the Zohar is a masterful approach to one of the most enchanting and intriguing texts of religious literature...This new volume will be read and reread with delight and fervor by teachers and students alike."
" Daniel Matt's translation of the Zohar is a masterful approach to one of the most enchanting and intriguing texts of religious literature. . . . This new volume will be read and reread with delight and fervor by teachers and students alike." -- Elie Wiesel
" Daniel C. Matt is giving us what I hardly thought possible: a superbly fashioned translation and commentary that opens up the Zohar to the English-speaking world. . . . The lucidity and overwhelming relevance of Matt's Zohar . . . will provide both common and uncommon readers with access to a work capable of changing the consciousness of those who enter it." -- Harold Bloom, Yale University
" Daniel Matt's translation of the "Zohar" is a masterful approach to one of the most enchanting and intriguing texts of religious literature. . . . This new volume will be read and reread with delight and fervor by teachers and students alike." -- Elie Wiesel
" An epochal event. . . . This work of learning will free us from the errors and misrepresentations that have long existed in almost all the popular accounts of the "Zohar," We shall have this text in which the "Zohar" appears in all of its spiritual depth." -- Rabbi Arthur Hertzberg
"Daniel Matt's translation of the "Zohar" is a masterful approach to one of the most enchanting and intriguing texts of religious literature. . . . This new volume will be read and reread with delight and fervor by teachers and students alike."--Elie Wiesel
"Daniel C. Matt is giving us what I hardly thought possible: a superbly fashioned translation and commentary that opens up the Zohar to the English-speaking world. . . . The lucidity and overwhelming relevance of Matt's Zohar . . . will provide both common and uncommon readers with access to a work capable of changing the consciousness of those who enter it."--Harold Bloom, Yale University
"An epochal event. . . . This work of learning will free us from the errors and misrepresentations that have long existed in almost all the popular accounts of the "Zohar," We shall have this text in which the "Zohar" appears in all of its spiritual depth."--Rabbi Arthur Hertzberg
0;Daniel Matt's translation of the "Zohar" is a masterful approach to one of the most enchanting and intriguing texts of religious literature. . . . This new volume will be read and reread with delight and fervor by teachers and students alike.1;2;Elie Wiesel
0;An epochal event. . . . This work of learning will free us from the errors and misrepresentations that have long existed in almost all the popular accounts of the "Zohar," We shall have this text in which the "Zohar" appears in all of its spiritual depth.1;2;Rabbi Arthur Hertzberg
0;Daniel C. Matt is giving us what I hardly thought possible: a superbly fashioned translation and commentary that opens up the Zohar to the English-speaking world. . . . The lucidity and overwhelming relevance of Matt's Zohar . . . will provide both common and uncommon readers with access to a work capable of changing the consciousness of those who enter it.1;2;Harold Bloom, Yale University