The Year of Magical Thinking

Joan Didion (Author)
Available

Description

From one of America's iconic writers, a stunning book of electric honesty and passion. Joan Didion explores an intensely personal yet universal experience: a portrait of a marriage--and a life, in good times and bad--that will speak to anyone who has ever loved a husband or wife or child.

Product Details

Price
$16.00  $14.72
Publisher
Vintage
Publish Date
February 13, 2007
Pages
227
Dimensions
5.2 X 0.7 X 7.9 inches | 0.5 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781400078431
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

Joan Didion was born in California and lives in New York City. She is the author of five novels and seven previous books of nonfiction.

Joan Didion's Where I Was From, Political Fictions, The Last Thing He Wanted, After Henry, Miami, Democracy, Salvador, A Book of Common Prayer, and Run River are available in Vintage paperback.

Reviews

"Thrilling . . . a living, sharp, and memorable book. . . . An exact, candid, and penetrating account of personal terror and bereavement . . . sometimes quite funny because it dares to tell the truth."
--Robert Pinsky, The New York Times Book Review

"Stunning candor and piercing details. . . . An indelible portrait of loss and grief."
--Michiko Kakutani, The New York Times

"I can't think of a book we need more than hers. . . . I can't imagine dying without this book."
--John Leonard, New York Review of Books

"Achingly beautiful. . . . We have come to admire and love Didion for her preternatural poise, unrivaled eye for absurdity, and Orwellian distaste for cant. It is thus a difficult, moving, and extraordinarily poignant experience to watch her direct such scrutiny inward."
--Gideon Lewis-Kraus, Los Angeles Times

"An act of consummate literary bravery, a writer known for her clarity allowing us to watch her mind as it becomes clouded with grief. . . . It also skips backward in time [to] call up a shimmering portrait of her unique marriage. . . . To make her grief real, Didion shows us what she has lost."
--Lev Grossman, Time