The Vanished: The Evaporated People of Japan in Stories and Photographs

(Author) (Photographer)
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Product Details

Price
$22.99
Publisher
Skyhorse Publishing
Publish Date
Pages
272
Dimensions
5.7 X 7.6 X 1.2 inches | 1.6 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9781510708266

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About the Author

Léna Mauger is an avid traveler and journalist for the magazines XXI and 6mois. She first explored the subject of Japan's "evaporated people" for a piece in XXI.

Stéphane Remael is a documentary photographer. He has traveled the world to cover stories in Bolivia, Georgia, China, Nepal, and Morocco, among other places. His work has been published in numerous French and international newspapers and magazines such as Newsweek, TIME, the Financial Times, and the Wall Street Journal.

Reviews

"Bears witness to the loneliness and sadness of the 'evaporated people.'" --Kirkus

"Chilling." --New York Post

"An extraordinary book. An investigation that reads like a novel." --Nicolas Demorand, France Inter

"The Vanished is a valuable look at a side of Japan rarely mentioned by its inhabitants. Hats off to Mauger and Remael for investigating areas where 'normal' Japanese don't dare to tread." --Benjamin Boas, Keio University, Tokyo

"Reading The Vanished, I felt like I was really there, traveling together with Léna and Stéphane and discovering with them different layers of understanding deeper than what I apparently see in my daily life here in Tokyo. One of those books that leave an imprint and make you think about what is important in life. I feel the word johatsu will stay in my heart forever." --Hector Garcia, author, A Geek in Japan

"An important book about a facet of Japanese society that often slips below the focal points of other, more sweeping treatments of Japan. . . . I hope the book will be translated into Japanese." --Charles T. Whipple, author, Seeing Japan and A Matter of Tea

"A brilliant and meticulous investigation." --Générations Plus