The Ultimate Children's Classic Collection

Frances Hodgson Burnett (Author) Anna Sewell (Author)
& 3 more
Backorder (temporarily out of stock)

Description

The perfect gift for any book-lover, this box set contains eight of the best children's classics ever written

Beautifully packaged in a ridged, matt-laminated slipcase with metallic detailing, complete with strikingly attractive, bespoke artwork, this would make an ideal Christmas present


Includes:
Alice's Adventures in Wonderland 9781853261183
The Wind in the Willows 9781853261220
Treasure Island 9781853261039
Black Beauty 9781853261091
The Jungle Book 9781853261190
The Secret Garden 9781853261046
Peter Pan 9781853261206

Product Details

Price
$24.99  $22.99
Publisher
Wordsworth Editions
Publish Date
September 25, 2015
Pages
1792
Dimensions
5.1 X 7.9 X 4.0 inches | 2.85 pounds
Language
English
Type
Boxed Set
EAN/UPC
9781840225990
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

Frances Eliza Hodgson Burnett (24 November 1849 - 29 October 1924) was a British-American novelist and playwright. She is best known for the three children's novels Little Lord Fauntleroy (published in 1885-1886), A Little Princess (1905), and The Secret Garden (1911). Frances Eliza Hodgson was born in Cheetham, Manchester, England. After her father died in 1852, when Frances was 3 years old, the family fell on straitened circumstances and in 1865 emigrated to the United States, settling in New Market, Tennessee. There, Frances began writing to help earn money for the family, publishing stories in magazines from the age of 19. In 1870, her mother died, and in 1872 she married Swan Burnett, who became a medical doctor. The Burnetts lived for two years in Paris, where their two sons were born, before returning to the United States to live in Washington, D.C. Burnett then began to write novels, the first of which (That Lass o' Lowrie's), was published to good reviews. Little Lord Fauntleroy was published in 1886 and made her a popular writer of children's fiction, although her romantic adult novels written in the 1890s were also popular. She wrote and helped to produce stage versions of Little Lord Fauntleroy and A Little Princess. Beginning in the 1880s, Burnett began to travel to England frequently and in the 1890s bought a home there, where she wrote The Secret Garden. Her elder son, Lionel, died of tuberculosis in 1890, which caused a relapse of the depression she had struggled with for much of her life. She divorced Swan Burnett in 1898, married Stephen Townsend in 1900, and divorced him in 1902. A few years later she settled in Nassau County, New York, where she died in 1924 and is buried in Roslyn Cemetery. In 1936, a memorial sculpture by Bessie Potter Vonnoh was erected in her honour in Central Park's Conservatory Garden. The statue depicts her two famous Secret Garden characters, Mary and Dickon.

Anna Sewell (1820-1878) was born in England. A knee injury at fourteen left her disabled, but she rode and drove horses very well. She began learning about horses early in life, spending many hours driving her father to and from the station from which he commuted to work. Her dependence on horse-drawn transportation fostered her respect of horses. She wrote her one book, Black Beauty, in her fifties, and it was published in 1877 just five months before she died. Although it is now considered a children's classic, she originally wrote it for those who worked with horses. She said "a special aim [was] to induce kindness, sympathy, and an understanding treatment of horses." The book has had a tremendous impact in creating a new wave of humane thinking towards animals.

Lewis Carroll was born on the 27th of January, 1832, as Charles Lutwidge Dogson at Daresbury in Cheshire, England. Carroll is best known for his children's books "Alice's Adventures in Wonderland" and "Through the Looking-Glass", which quickly became international successes and to this day inspire films, art, and research. Other famous works of his are the poems The Hunting of the Snark' and Jabberwocky'. Carroll had a prodigious talent in mathematics, logics, word play and philos

Kenneth Grahame (1859-1932) was a Scottish writer, most famous for one of the all-time classics of children's literature, The Wind in the Willows, as well as for The Reluctant Dragon.

Robert Louis Balfour Stevenson, novelist, essayist, and poet, is considered to be one of the great classic storytellers. Stevenson wrote a number of popular and enduring fantasies, including Treasure Island (1883) and 'The Strange Case of Dr Jekyll and Mr Hyde (1886).