The Turncoat

Siegfried Lenz (Author) John Cullen (Translator)
Available

Product Details

Price
$17.99  $16.55
Publisher
Other Press (NY)
Publish Date
October 06, 2020
Pages
384
Dimensions
5.2 X 7.8 X 1.1 inches | 0.9 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781590510537

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About the Author

Siegfried Lenz, born in Lyck in East Prussia in 1926, is one of the most important and widely read writers in postwar and present-day European literature. During World War II he deserted the German army and was briefly held as a prisoner of war. He published twelve novels, including The German Lesson, and produced several collections of short stories, essays, and plays. His works have won numerous prizes, including the Goethe Prize and the German Booksellers' Peace Prize.

John Cullen is the translator of many books from Spanish, French, German, and Italian, including Susanna Tamaro's Follow Your Heart, Philippe Claudel's Brodeck, Carla Guelfenbein's In the Distance with You, Juli Zeh's Empty Hearts, Patrick Modiano's Villa Triste, and Kamel Daoud's The Meursault Investigation. He lives on the Shoreline in southern Connecticut.

Reviews

"While the novel was way ahead of the curve in 1951, today it is immensely relevant. Nationalist tendencies are on the rise all over the globe, the desire for strong leaders and simple answers to complex questions is more and more prevalent. The Turncoat deals with issues that are highly urgent today; therefore, it is a novel ripe for adaptation. Lenz has succeeded in facing these complex questions of guilt and responsibility on a deeply human level. He tells this through the viewpoint of his characters so we can not only relate to and understand their emotions but live through them as well." --Florian Gallenberger, Academy Award-winning director

"First, this is quite a surprise, and second, after reading the book, a sensation. The Turncoat is a brilliant novel, adding an impressive work to Lenz's output, and thus to German postwar literature." --Der Spiegel