The Spirit of 74: How the American Revolution Began

Ray Raphael (Author) Marie Raphael (Author)
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Description

How ordinary people went from resistance to revolution: " A] concise, lively narrative . . . the authors expertly build tension." --Publishers Weekly

Americans know about the Boston Tea Party and "the shot heard 'round the world," but sixteen months divided these two iconic events, a period that has nearly been lost to history. The Spirit of '74 fills in this gap in our nation's founding narrative, showing how in these mislaid months, step by step, real people made a revolution.

After the Tea Party, Parliament not only shut down a port but also revoked the sacred Massachusetts charter. Completely disenfranchised, citizens rose up as a body and cast off British rule everywhere except in Boston, where British forces were stationed. A "Spirit of '74" initiated the American Revolution, much as the better-known "Spirit of '76" sparked independence. Redcoats marched on Lexington and Concord to take back a lost province, but they encountered Massachusetts militiamen who had trained for months to protect the revolution they had already made.

The Spirit of '74 places our founding moment in a rich new historical context, both changing and deepening its meaning for all Americans.

Product Details

Price
$26.95  $24.79
Publisher
New Press
Publish Date
September 15, 2015
Pages
288
Dimensions
5.4 X 1.2 X 8.3 inches | 1.0 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9781620971260

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About the Author

Ray Raphael's seventeen books include "A People's History of the American Revolution," "The First American Revolution," "Founders," "Constitutional Myths," and "Founding Myths." He is a senior research fellow at Humboldt State University. Marie Raphael, author of two historical novels, has taught literature and writing at Boston University, College of the Redwoods, and Humboldt State University. They live in Northern California.

Reviews


"Ray and Marie Raphael provide readers with the lively story of how, starting with the Boston Tea Party, Massachusetts turned from resistance to revolution in a single year. Using well-chosen quotations from participants, as well as revealing anecdotes, their masterful narrative brings to life the human drama of this grassroots transformation."
Richard Brown, Distinguished Professor of History emeritus, University of Connecticut
"A well-conceived work of popular history that fills a gap in the chronology of the American Revolution."
"Kirkus"
"
"Most people understand that the American Revolution began in Massachusetts. What they may not know is that the revolution actually began well over a year before the gunfire at Lexington and Concord. . . . This revolution in Massachusetts was not brought about by the well-known 'names' associated with the revolutionary period but rather by little known locals supported by many thousands of ordinary people. . . . In a very real sense what became the American Revolution joined the revolution that had already taken place in Massachusetts in 1774. The Raphaels tell this dramatic story in a fascinating and very readable manner. Even knowing that the events of April 19th are just over the horizon, the unfolding of the tale makes for exciting reading. . . . This book thoroughly explains what took place in Massachusetts between the Boston Tea Party and Lexington/Concord. Without this background of revolution the march to Concord doesn't make sense. The Spirit of 74 ties it all together."
--Journal of the American Revolution

"Ray and Marie Raphael provide readers with the lively story of how, starting with the Boston Tea Party, Massachusetts turned from resistance to revolution in a single year. Using well-chosen quotations from participants, as well as revealing anecdotes, their masterful narrative brings to life the human drama of this grassroots transformation."
--Richard Brown, Distinguished Professor of History emeritus, University of Connecticut

"A well-conceived work of popular history that fills a gap in the chronology of the American Revolution."
--Kirkus