The Society for Useful Knowledge: How Benjamin Franklin and Friends Brought the Enlightenment to America

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Product Details

Price
$27.00
Publisher
Bloomsbury Publishing PLC
Publish Date
Pages
240
Dimensions
6.19 X 0.86 X 9.8 inches | 1.12 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9781608195534

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About the Author

Jonathan Lyons is the author of The House of Wisdom: How the Arabs Transformed Western Civilization (Bloomsbury Press 2009). He served as editor and foreign correspondent for Reuters for more than 20 years. He holds a doctorate in sociology, and has taught at George Mason University, Georgetown University, and Monash University in Australia. He lives in Portland, Oregon.

Reviews

"Clear, focused snapshots of a movement and its celebrated leader." -- "Kirkus Reviews"
"Nothing was more crucial to America's founding than the Enlightenment, and no one played a more important role than Benjamin Franklin in transmitting the ideas of the Age of Enlightenment to the wider public in the form of useful knowledge. Jonathan Lyons, an engaging storyteller and insightful scholar, conveys the breathtaking sweep of this crucial story with grace and flair, and in the process he provides a compelling and innovative perspective on the American Revolution and the new nation that emerged from that upheaval."--John Ferling, author of "The Ascent of George Washington" and "Independence: The Struggle to Set America Free" "Lyons has done a fine job in giving us a glimpse not just of Franklin the virtuoso but of the world in which he lived and worked, his contemporaries, and their enthusiasms." -"Weekly Standard""In this highly readable account ... Lyons illuminates a formative period in American cultural history, the theme being that 'the value of learning and knowledge . . . is directly proportional to its practical import and utility.'"--"Booklist""Lyons has raised important questions about the origins of "useful knowledge" in America that will have wide appeal. Recommended."--"Library Journal""Clear, focused snapshots of a movement and its celebrated leader."--"Kirkus Reviews"

Nothing was more crucial to America's founding than the Enlightenment, and no one played a more important role than Benjamin Franklin in transmitting the ideas of the Age of Enlightenment to the wider public in the form of useful knowledge. Jonathan Lyons, an engaging storyteller and insightful scholar, conveys the breathtaking sweep of this crucial story with grace and flair, and in the process he provides a compelling and innovative perspective on the American Revolution and the new nation that emerged from that upheaval. "John Ferling, author of The Ascent of George Washington and Independence: The Struggle to Set America Free"

Lyons has done a fine job in giving us a glimpse not just of Franklin the virtuoso but of the world in which he lived and worked, his contemporaries, and their enthusiasms. "Weekly Standard"

In this highly readable account Lyons illuminates a formative period in American cultural history, the theme being that the value of learning and knowledge . . . is directly proportional to its practical import and utility.' "Booklist"

Lyons has raised important questions about the origins of "useful knowledge" in America that will have wide appeal. Recommended. "Library Journal"

Clear, focused snapshots of a movement and its celebrated leader. "Kirkus Reviews""

"Nothing was more crucial to America's founding than the Enlightenment, and no one played a more important role than Benjamin Franklin in transmitting the ideas of the Age of Enlightenment to the wider public in the form of useful knowledge. Jonathan Lyons, an engaging storyteller and insightful scholar, conveys the breathtaking sweep of this crucial story with grace and flair, and in the process he provides a compelling and innovative perspective on the American Revolution and the new nation that emerged from that upheaval." --John Ferling, author of The Ascent of George Washington and Independence: The Struggle to Set America Free

"Lyons has done a fine job in giving us a glimpse not just of Franklin the virtuoso but of the world in which he lived and worked, his contemporaries, and their enthusiasms." --Weekly Standard

"In this highly readable account ... Lyons illuminates a formative period in American cultural history, the theme being that 'the value of learning and knowledge . . . is directly proportional to its practical import and utility.'" --Booklist

"Lyons has raised important questions about the origins of "useful knowledge" in America that will have wide appeal. Recommended." --Library Journal

"Clear, focused snapshots of a movement and its celebrated leader." --Kirkus Reviews