The Silver Nutmeg: The Story of Anna Lavinia and Toby

Palmer Brown (Author)
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Description

Anna Lavinia's father wanted her to have another point of view, so what did he do? He made a peephole in the garden wall. But he couldn't have known that this new view would lead Anna Lavinia all the way to the upside-down mirror land that lies on the other side of the pond. Here Anna Lavinia meets Toby, who explains that on the other side, instead of gravity, there's something called "the tingle," which feels like "the tickle that comes before a sneeze, or the thrill that comes when the knot in a ribbon just begins to loosen," and allows for floating and spectacular feats of tree-climbing (but mind your furniture doesn't drift away ). Toby introduces Anna Lavinia to a variety of wonders and oddballs, including an uncanny fortune-teller, a turtle with a jungle on its back, and Aunt Cornelia, who's never quite recovered from the disappearance of a certain young man into Anna Lavinia's world a very long time ago.

The Silver Nutmeg continues the adventures begun in Beyond the Pawpaw Trees, and features loads of sense, a little nonsense, and more charming verses from Anna Lavinia's favorite book of rhymes. Best of all, fans of Palmer Brown's intricate drawings will find every page a delight for the eyes

Product Details

Price
$15.95
Publisher
New York Review of Books
Publish Date
April 10, 2012
Pages
152
Dimensions
5.77 X 0.69 X 8.75 inches | 0.69 pounds
Language
English
Type
Hardcover
EAN/UPC
9781590175002
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

Palmer Brown (1920-2012) was born in Chicago and attended Swarthmore and the University of Pennsylvania. He is the author and illustrator of five books for children, including Beyond the Pawpaw Trees and its sequel, The Silver Nutmeg; Cheerful; and Hickory. About Beyond the Pawpaw Trees, his first published book, Brown said: "If it has any moral at all, it is hoped that it will always be a deep secret between the author and those of his readers who still know that believing is seeing."