The Scene That Became Cities: What Burning Man Philosophy Can Teach Us about Building Better Communities

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Product Details

Price
$19.95
Publisher
North Atlantic Books
Publish Date
June 25, 2019
Pages
356
Dimensions
5.9 X 1.0 X 8.9 inches | 1.25 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781623173692
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

For the last ten years, Caveat Magister, aka Benjamin Wachs, has been actively writing about Burning Man culture and engaging with Burning Man at the cutting edge of its philosophy, composing over 250 articles about it for the Burning Man website. By 2015, this work had made him, outside of Larry Harvey and his fellow founders, one of the leading interpreters of Burning Man within its own culture. In 2015, Larry Harvey asked Caveat, along with Burning Man's Director of Education, Stuart Mangrum, to sit on a committee, officially called the Philosophical Center of the Burning Man nonprofit.

Reviews

"Burning Man--the annual event in the Nevada desert that has been described as an experiment in community and art--has spawned, if not a philosophy and practice, a worldview and movement."
--Publishers Weekly

"This wise and insightful book by Caveat Magister, one of Burning Man founder Larry Harvey's muses, takes us on a sublime and illuminating journey that helps explain why the world needs Burning Man and its Ten Principles more than ever."
--Chip Conley, author of PEAK: How Great Companies Get Their Mojo from Maslow

"Deeply personal yet accessible, The Scene That Became Cities is a first of its kind in the genre of Burning Man literature. The wide-ranging, exemplary discussions thoughtfully cover topics from whether Burning Man truly facilitates individual transformations, to its relevance in the political sphere, to how to translate the principle of radical inclusion, to what Burning Man can offer broader society."
--Katherine K. Chen, associate professor in the Department of Sociology, The City College of New York