The Parents We Mean to Be: How Well-Intentioned Adults Undermine Children's Moral and Emotional Development

Available

Description

A wake-up call for a national crisis in parenting--and a deeply helpful book for those who want to see their own behaviors as parents with the greatest possible clarity.Harvard psychologist RichardWeissbourd argues incisively that parents--not peers, not television--are the primary shapers of their children's moral lives. And yet, it is parents' lack of self-awareness and confused priorities that are dangerously undermining children's development.
Through the author's own original field research, including hundreds of rich, revealing conversations with children, parents, teachers, and coaches, a surprising picture emerges.
Parents' intense focus on their children's happiness is turning many children into self-involved, fragile conformists.The suddenly widespread desire of parents to be closer to their children--a heartening trend in many ways--often undercuts kids'morality.Our fixation with being great parents--and our need for our children to reflect that greatness--can actually make them feel ashamed for failing to measure up. Finally, parents' interactions with coaches and teachers--and coaches' and teachers' interactions with children--are critical arenas for nurturing, or eroding, children's moral lives.
Weissbourd's ultimately compassionate message--based on compelling new research--is that the intense, crisis-filled, and profoundly joyous process of raising a child can be a powerful force for our own moral development.

Product Details

Price
$14.95
Publisher
Mariner Books
Publish Date
September 03, 2010
Pages
256
Dimensions
4.94 X 0.63 X 8.44 inches | 0.53 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9780547248035
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About the Author

Richard Weissbourd is a child and family psychologist on the faculty of Harvard's School of Education and Kennedy School of Government.