The Measure of a Man

Available

Product Details

Price
$16.99  $15.63
Publisher
HarperOne
Publish Date
Pages
272
Dimensions
5.39 X 0.7 X 8.0 inches | 0.54 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9780061357909

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About the Author

Sidney Poitier was the first black actor to win the Academy Award for best actor for his outstanding performance in Lilies of the Field in 1963. His landmark films include The Defiant Ones, A Patch of Blue, Guess Who's Coming to Dinner, and To Sir, With Love. He has starred in over forty films, directed nine, and written four. He is the author of two autobiographies: This Life and the Oprah's Book Club pick and New York Times bestseller The Measure of a Man. Among many other accolades, Poitier has been awarded the Screen Actors Guild's highest honor, the Life Achievement Award, for an outstanding career and humanitarian accomplishment. He is married, has six daughters, four grandchildren, and one great-granddaughter.

Reviews

Candid memoirs from teh actor who has starred in more than forty movies, directed nine, and written four.--USA Today
An affecting new memoir.--Dallas Morning News
In this powerful book, [Poitier] shares his touchsotnes with us and makes us question what foundations guide our own lives.--Ebony
Revealing . . . Poitier invites us to re-examine his work and, through it, our history.--New York Times Magazine
Reflective, generous, humane . . . moving . . .[Poitier] writes with vivid emotion.--New York Times Book Review
Having already penned a book about his professsional life, legendary actor Sidney Poitier tackles a greater subject--life itself--with this new spiritual autobiography.--American Way
"With the unwavering sense of dignity and worth . . .this man's authenticity is earned by the life he describes."--Los Angeles Times
Reading The Measure of a Man is somewhat akin to having a worthwhile conversation with a revered older relative; he doesn't always tell you what you want to hear, but you appreciate it just the same.--Washington Post