The Last Christians: Stories of Persecution, Flight, and Resilience in the Middle East

(Author) (Translator)
Available

Product Details

Price
$18.00  $16.56
Publisher
Plough Publishing House
Publish Date
Pages
233
Dimensions
5.5 X 0.7 X 8.5 inches | 0.7 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9780874860627

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About the Author

A poet, priest, and popular author in Germany, Andreas Knapp left a secure position as head of Freiburg Seminary to live and work among the poor as a member of the Little Brothers of the Gospel, a religious order inspired by Charles de Foucauld. Today he shares an apartment with three brothers in Leipzig's largest housing project, and ministers to prisoners and refugees. His latest book, The Last Christians, recounts the stories of refugees in his neighborhood and of displaced people in camps in Kurdistan, northern Iraq.

Reviews

This book is alarming, suspenseful, and stirring. The Last Christians: Stories of Persecution, Flight, and Resilience in the Middle East takes stock of the precarious situation of Christians in the Middle East. Every so often the reader will need to pause and reflect. Inevitably, the question arises: How would I have reacted in that situation? How would I have behaved? What would I have done? Yet the book's narrative compels one to keep reading. ... One would wish to give this book as recommended reading to all Christians, and especially to all politicians. Many eyes would be opened. --Catholic News Network
Knapp's book The Last Christians is a historical narrative written from the victims' perspective. It seeks to explain why the once flourishing culture of Christianity in the Middle East has been steadily decimated over the course of centuries, and why, in light of the Islamization of the entire region in recent years, for many Christian refugees the hope of returning to their homelands has dwindled. --Day by Day radio show
Knapp is especially impressed that Aramaic Christians have remained nonviolent and peaceable, despite centuries of continual violent oppression. Yousif, the refugee Knapp accompanies to Iraq, comments, "For the terrorists, it is an honor to kill. Shouldn't it be an honor for us Christians to pray for and love our persecutors?" --Borromeo Society
In his book The Last Christians, Andreas Knapp reports on the tragic decline of Christian communities in Iraq and Syria. His book is a harrowing report on the demise of Christianity in the territories of the Middle East ruled by the Islamic State. --Sunday newsweekly
Knapp is sincere in his beliefs, and his passionate book will provide much-needed anecdotal testimony for readers interested in the plight of Christians throughout Iraq and Syria. --Publishers Weekly