The Language of Butterflies: How Thieves, Hoarders, Scientists, and Other Obsessives Unlocked the Secrets of the World's Favorite Insect

Wendy Williams (Author) Angela Brazil (Read by)
Available

Product Details

Price
$34.99  $32.19
Publisher
Simon & Schuster Audio
Publish Date
June 02, 2020
Dimensions
5.8 X 5.7 X 0.9 inches | 0.6 pounds
Language
English
Type
Compact Disc
EAN/UPC
9781797109626

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About the Author

Science journalist Wendy Williams has spent her life outdoors, either on the back of a horse, on skis, or on her own two feet. She has spent a great deal of time in a variety of countries in Africa, walking in the fields and forests of Europe, and exploring North American mountain chains and prairies. She lives on Cape Cod in Massachusetts with her husband and her Border Collie Taff. She is the author of The Horse and The Language of Butterflies.
Angela Brazil (30 November 1868 - 13 March 1947) was one of the first British writers of modern schoolgirls' stories, written from the characters' point of view and intended primarily as entertainment rather than moral instruction. In the first half of the 20th century she published nearly 50 books of girls' fiction, the vast majority being boarding school stories. She also published numerous short stories in magazines. Her books were commercially successful, widely read by pre-adolescent girls, and influenced them. Though interest in girls' school stories waned after World War II, her books remained popular until the 1960s. They were seen as disruptive and a negative influence on moral standards by some figures in authority during the height of their popularity, and in some cases were banned, or indeed burned, by headmistresses in British girls' schools. While her stories have been much imitated in more recent decades, and many of her motifs and plot elements have since become clichΓ©s or the subject of parody, they were innovative when they first appeared. Brazil made a major contribution to changing the nature of fiction for girls. She presented a young female point of view which was active, aware of current issues and independent-minded; she recognised adolescence as a time of transition, and accepted girls as having common interests and concerns which could be shared and acted upon.

Reviews

"The butterfly's life cycle has always symbolized transformation. In this awe-inspiring book, Williams shows us how these animals can also transform whole ecosystems, scientific disciplines, and human hearts."

-- "Abigail Tucker, New York Times bestselling author"