The Labor of Lunch, Volume 70: Why We Need Real Food and Real Jobs in American Public Schools

Available

Product Details

Price
$29.95
Publisher
University of California Press
Publish Date
November 12, 2019
Pages
312
Dimensions
6.0 X 8.9 X 0.9 inches | 0.9 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9780520300033

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About the Author

Jennifer E. Gaddis is Assistant Professor in the Department of Civil Society and Community Studies in the School of Human Ecology at the University of Wisconsin, Madison.

Reviews

"The Labor of Lunch lays out how transforming the food culture in American schools can significantly improve both the lives of the country's low-wage cafeteria workers and those of the millions of children they feed every day."-- "Quality Assurance Magazine"
"Argues that universally free, from-scratch lunches turns the school cafeteria into a vital community resource: one that helps kids develop healthy eating habits and provides skilled jobs for workers."--Tom Philpott "Mother Jones"
"When we think about the crumbling national infrastructure that holds our country back, Jennifer Gaddis argues that we need to look beyond bridges, broadband, and high-speed rail -- and see the urgency of bringing our nation's 100,000 school cafeterias into the 21st century. She's on exactly the right track. What if our nation's largest restaurant chain -- our 100,000 schools -- could be retooled as an engine for creating good jobs in our communities, building our local farm economies, and nourishing our kids with fresh-cooked food?"
--Curt Ellis "Co-Founder & CEO, FoodCorps"

"A welcome addition to the growing library of works focusing on labor in the food system. This topic deserves attention and Gaddis is looking at the plight of an especially neglected group, the people who make and serve food to kids in schools. . . . Let grass-roots advocacy begin!"

--Marion Nestle "Food Politics"

"Gaddis addresses implicit biases the reader may hold about lunch ladies by guiding us through a richly-layered history of school food and labor."

--Marion Nestle "Boom California"