The Interrogators: Task Force 500 and America's Secret War Against Al Qaeda

Chris Mackey (Author) Greg Miller (Author)
Available

Description

More than 3,000 prisoners in the war on terrorism have been captured, held, and interrogated in Afghanistan alone. But no one knows what transpired in those interactions between prisoner and interrogator -- until now.

In The Interrogators, Chris Mackey, the senior interrogator at Bagram Air Base and in Kandahar, where al-Qaeda and Taliban prisoners were first detained and questioned, lifts the curtain. Soldiers specially trained in the art of interrogation went face-to-face with the enemy. These mental and psychological battles were as grueling, dramatic, and important as any in the war on terrorism. We learn how, under Mackey's command, his small group of "soldier spies" engineered a breakthrough in interrogation strategy, rewriting techniques and tactics grounded in the Cold War.

Mackey reveals the tricks of the trade, and we see how his team -- four men and one woman -- responded to the pressure and the prisoners. By the time Mackey's group was finished, virtually no prisoner went unbroken.

Product Details

Price
$22.99
Publisher
Back Bay Books
Publish Date
May 12, 2005
Pages
483
Dimensions
5.5 X 1.3 X 8.5 inches | 1.25 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9780316011532
BISAC Categories:

Earn by promoting books

Earn money by sharing your favorite books through our Affiliate program.

Become an affiliate

About the Author

GREG MILLER is a national security reporter for the Washington Post. He was part of the team that won the 2018 Pulitzer Prize for their groundbreaking stories on Russia's 2016 election interference and also part of the team awarded the 2014 Pulitzer for coverage of American surveillance programs revealed by Edward Snowden.

Reviews

""Highly compelling....A fascinating study of the interrogator's art....For as long as the words Abu Ghraib reverberate around the world, this will remain a timely and important book. It is proof of one of the more engaging qualities of the American character: openness."