The Honey of Earth

David Graham (Author) Diane Lockward (Editor)
Available

Description

How can I--or anyone--not adore David Graham's new collection? The tone throughout is hospitable, wry, and affirming even while acknowledging that loss and suffering are ever present. The honey of earth "comes and goes at once," Wallace Stevens wrote, and these poems embody that paradox in vivid detail and compelling language. The sweetness that life offers--love, art, music, family, nature--exists simultaneously with the bitterness it guarantees--pain, grief, death. Both coming and going, The Honey of Earth deftly weaves "darkness and light together" with great wisdom, humor, and compassion. --Eric Nelson

Product Details

Price
$16.00  $14.72
Publisher
Terrapin Books
Publish Date
July 30, 2019
Pages
92
Dimensions
6.0 X 0.22 X 9.0 inches | 0.32 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781947896192
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

David Graham has published two full-length collections of poetry, Magic Shows and Second Wind, as well as four chapbooks, most recently Stutter Monk. He is also co-editor of After Confession: Poetry as Autobiography (with Kate Sontag) and Local News: Poetry About Small Towns (with Tom Montag). He retired in 2016 from teaching writing and literature at Ripon College, where he also hosted the Visiting Writers Series for twenty-eight years. He has served on The Poets' Prize Committee and the Wisconsin Poet Laureate Commission and was a Resident Poet and a faculty member at The Frost Place. Currently he is a contributing editor for Verse-Virtual, where he contributes a monthly column, "Poetic License," on poetry and poets. After retiring, he returned to his native upstate New York with his wife, the artist Lee Shippey.
Diane Lockward is the author of The Crafty Poet: A Portable Workshop and four poetry books, most recently The Uneaten Carrots of Atonement. She is the recipient of the Quentin R. Howard Poetry Prize, a poetry fellowship from the New Jersey State Council on the Arts, and a Woman of Achievement Award. Her poems have appeared in Harvard Review, Southern Poetry Review, Prairie Schooner, and elsewhere. Her work has also been featured on Poetry Daily, Verse Daily, and The Writer's Almanac. She is the founder, editor, and publisher of Terrapin Books.

Reviews

Reading David Graham's The Honey of Earth, I felt my heart break and then mend almost at once. Graham sees and strikes the sweet spot between pathos and comedy: in tone, in imagery, in how precisely he nails the complex absurdities and ironies of American life, including his own life. Considering the objects in a junk shop, he writes "you can almost see how every miserable / doo-dad was once someone's luminous dream," or, in an elegy he juxtaposes "ashes in a box" with "ashpits smoking in backyards, rest stop tiles / smeared with grease and cracker crumbs." There's the ride up the scale, and the drop down, but overall, an exuberance born of a love of life, of Earth, of art, of real or imagined others, of America itself. The poems are taut and economical yet balanced with felicities of phrasing and figurations: In this way as well, with consummate skill, Graham finds the sweet spot. --Gray Jacobik

There I was, getting all set to cough up the usual clever blurb, when suddenly I thought, "The hell with that! This is simply the best damned book of poems I have read in years!" Dear Reader, if you think I say so because David Graham was one of my earliest and favorite students, well, you're wrong. That his name is not up there with the many luminaries to which he is patently superior--well again, that says more about the sad state of elite tastes than it does about this brilliant writer. --Sydney Lea