The Hare

(Author) (Translator)
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Product Details

Price
$14.95  $13.75
Publisher
New Directions Publishing Corporation
Publish Date
Pages
224
Dimensions
5.09 X 0.69 X 7.1 inches | 0.53 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9780811220903
BISAC Categories:

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About the Author

The poet CHRIS ANDREWS teaches at the University of Western Sydney, Australia, where he is a member of the Writing and Society Research Centre. He has translated books by Roberto Bolano and César Aira for New Directions. He has won the Anthony Hecht Poetry Prize for his poetry and the Valle-Inclan Prize and the French-American Foundation Translation Prize for his translations.
Nick Caistor has lived for several years in Buenos Aires as well as visiting it often over the past three decades. He has reported on Argentina for the BBC/WGBH and is a translator as well as the author of numerous books on Latin America, including Che Guevara: A Life (also published by Interlink).

Reviews

Aira's refusal to make any occurrence definitive gives the world depicted in the novel an element of the absurd. The result can be as frustrating as it is liberating. Whether or not Clarke ultimately catches sight of the hare is beside the point. Even if he found it, we'd soon discover that, maybe, after all, he didn't. Or that it wasn't a hare at all.
Aira's literary significance, like that of many other science fiction writers, comes from how he pushes us to question the porous line between fact and fantasy, to see it not only as malleable in history, but also blurred in the everyday. The engrossing power of his work, though, comes from how he carries out these feats: with the inexhaustible energy and pleasure of a child chasing after imaginary enemies in the park.
The novel moves erratically, never quite landing where you think, and as mysterious subplot after subplot is introduced, one may be forgiven for suspecting that Aira is playing a joke at the expense of the reader, but in his masterful hands, ambiguity eventually builds to order, mystery to revelation, and every digression turns out to have a purpose -- all without ever undercutting the fundamental tension that Aira has created between his reasoned protagonist and the novel's ambiguous setting.