The Great War in America: World War I and Its Aftermath

Garrett Peck (Author)
Available

Product Details

Price
$17.95  $16.51
Publisher
Pegasus Books
Publish Date
July 21, 2020
Pages
448
Dimensions
5.5 X 8.4 X 0.9 inches | 1.05 pounds
Language
English
Type
Paperback
EAN/UPC
9781643134819

Earn by promoting books

Earn money by sharing your favorite books through our Affiliate program.

Become an affiliate

About the Author

Garrett Peck, author of The Great War in America, is a historian who serves on the advisory council of the Woodrow Wilson House in Washington, D.C. He has lectured at the Library of Congress, the National Archives, the National Museum of American History, and the Smithsonian Institution. He lives in Arlington, Virginia.

Reviews

Peck's pointillist picture of America on the home front will be sure to interest World War I buffs. He has much to say about war bonds and War Gardens, anti-German hysteria and the deplorable suppression of civil liberties. He also follows the doughboys to Belgium and France, where they discover the French fry but shell shock, too.
Peck's compact book is an immensely readable account. His affection for his subject shines through the book.
Peck's book reminds us that Whitman is all around us. Whitman's Washington years overall provide an engaging read that reminds us that in this area, we are uniquely surrounded and suffused with the history of our nation.--Tom Sherwood
The Great War in America plumbs the decision of Woodrow Wilson to send American soldiers into the nightmare of trench warfare during the latter 19 months of World War I and how winning the peace created the inevitability of World War II.
A new history of World War I, viewed through the lens of America, where it 'was an enormously contentious issue.' Peck proves a reliable guide to 'a nation that was rapidly growing up--and yet not mature enough to accept its global responsibilities.' Students of 20th-century American and European history will enjoy this American view of the war and its long-term consequences.
The story traces America's journey from geopolitical isolation to engagement and back to a more committed isolation -- a retrenchment that, like Woodrow Wilson, Peck considers a mistake. Along the way, Peck shares plenty of details worthy of their own histories.